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When i try to run the following program:

// ConsoleApplication1.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::ifstream inFile("test.txt");

    if(!inFile.is_open()){
        std::cout << "Doesn't work" << std::endl;
    }

    inFile.close();
    return 0;
}

The program isn't able to open the file, the file exists in the same folder as the executable(I also tried to put in the explicit path of the file: C:\Users\..)

The value of the variable inFile after trying to open the file is:

+ inFile    {_Filebuffer={_Set_eback=0xcccccccc <Error reading characters of string.> _Set_egptr=0xcccccccc <Error reading characters of string.> ...} }    std::basic_ifstream<char,std::char_traits<char> >
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2  
Are you running from inside Visual Studio? Are you sure the programs current directory is actually where the file (and executable) is? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 1 '14 at 18:51
    
Ah you're right, I was debugging, it seems that's done from another directory, thanks. –  GoldnEagle Jan 1 '14 at 18:55
    
Using relative paths is not ever not a mistake. Unless you explicitly set the current working directory for your thread you cannot know which file is accessed. Use absolute file names instead. Always. –  IInspectable Jan 1 '14 at 19:00

1 Answer 1

Try this:

// ConsoleApplication1.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    std::ifstream inFile("c:\\test.txt");

    if(!inFile.is_open())
    {
        std::cout << "Doesn't work" << std::endl;
    }

    inFile.close();
    return 0;
}

This should work if you put your file to C:\test.txt. The rest is up to you to figure out. Relative paths work, you need to make sure the file is where your program looks for it (or the other way 'round). Try to print out the current path if you are unsure what's wrong.

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