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I'm in networking and I'm absolutely new to low level programming. I've written a very simple C program to disassemble and read and crack.

What I'd like to do: Edit the ASM of a file in GDB permanently, though I believe there is a way to do it for that run only.

0x00000000004005f8 <+75>: call 0x4004b0 <__isoc99_scanf@plt>
0x00000000004005fd <+80>: mov eax,DWORD PTR [rbp-0x18]
0x0000000000400600 <+83>: cmp eax,DWORD PTR [rbp-0x4]

I would like to be:

0x00000000004005f8 <+75>: call 0x4004b0 <__isoc99_scanf@plt>
0x00000000004005fd <+80>: mov eax,DWORD PTR [rbp-0x18]
0x0000000000400600 <+83>: cmp eax,eax

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Which part do you have a problem with? Overwriting the bytes in memory or generating the new opcode? – Carl Norum Jan 2 '14 at 3:25
    
BTW, you can almost certainly overwrite the bytes in the file to make it permanent, too. – Carl Norum Jan 2 '14 at 3:27
    
Probably the latter. Honestly, I know ASM better than I know GDB. I'd like to overwrite the ASM inside of it. Even if it's not permanent. – Goodies Jan 2 '14 at 3:27

In this case, you're in luck, since cmp eax, eax has a shorter encoding than cmp eax,DWORD PTR [rbp-0x4]. Just replace the bytes at 0x400600 with the new instruction and a single byte nop.

Before:

Instruction                    Encoding
cmp eax,DWORD PTR [rbp-0x4]    3b 45 fc

After:

Instruction                    Encoding
cmp eax, eax                   39 c0
nop                            90

In GDB, you could do so by making yourself a simple pointer and then overwriting those bytes:

(gdb) set $p = (unsigned char *)0x400600
(gdb) set $p[0] = 0x39
(gdb) set $p[1] = 0xc0
(gdb) set $p[2] = 0x90
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