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I am new to C++ and there is a basic problem I am dealing with. The code below gives complier error:

    #include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct contact_info {
    long number;
    string name;
};

contact_info take(){
    contact_info takein[2];

    for (int i=0; i<2; i++) {
    cout<<"what is the name"<<"\n";
    getline(cin,takein[i].name);
    cout<<"what is the phone number"<<"\n";
    cin>>takein[i].number;
    };
    return takein;
};

void give(contact_info takein){
    cout<<"Name:"<<takein.name<<"\n"<<"Number:"<<takein.number;
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    contact_info takein;
    takein=take();
    give(takein);
    return 0;
}

The error comes from function "take" and is "No viable conversion from 'contact_info[2]' to 'contact_info'" The code is supposed to take two contact informations in a loop and then prints them on the screen. I think I need to use pointers for that to pass the "takein" from "take" function to "main" function. Can anyone says if I can fix the code using array and not pointer?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
struct contact_info
{
    long number;
    string name;
};

void take(contact_info takein[2])
{

for (int i=0; i<2; i++) 
    {
     cout<<"what is the name"<<"\n";
     getline(cin,takein[i].name);
     cout<<"what is the phone number"<<"\n";
     cin>>takein[i].number;
     };
};

void give(contact_info takein)
{
cout<<"Name:"<<takein.name<<"\n"<<"Number:"<<takein.number;
};

int main()
{
contact_info takein[2];
take(takein);
for(int i=0;i<2;++i)
give(takein[i]);
return 0;
}
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return takein;

but

contact_info takein[2];

Compiler is upset because you're trying to return an array, use return takin[0]; or return takin[1]; to return a specific contact_info

Addendum

Don't be afraid to learn Python first, higher level languages are a lot more forgiving and python is by no means a toy language, Python and C++ are two things I use daily and I love them both. I tolerate Java, it can be good when you want static typing and something more forgiving than C++, or in my case Android :P

If you edit your question to describe what you want to do I am happy to provide some annotated code to demonstrate, leave a comment to this to get my attention.

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But then in main function I need to have a for loop to take the returned array elements. I think there should be better way. Thanks for sharing your idea though. –  Amin R. Jan 2 '14 at 7:11
    
@AminR. there is, #include <vector> - return a vector of contacts instead ;) –  Alec Teal Jan 2 '14 at 7:13
contact_info[] take(){
...
}

if you are trying to return an array.

for returning an element, use

return takein[0];

or

return takein[1];
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1  
You should probably explain more about returning arrays, especially regarding size, he is learning - it should be a good chunk of why not "here, take this" ;) –  Alec Teal Jan 2 '14 at 7:07
    
Nope! it's still complaining. –  Amin R. Jan 2 '14 at 7:09

If your goal is "to take two contact informations in a loop and then prints them on the screen", you must pass an array to get information and pass an array to prints it:

contact_info * take(contact_info *takein){    
    for (int i=0; i<2; i++) {
      cout<<"what is the name"<<"\n";
      getline(cin, takein[i].name);
      cout<<"what is the phone number"<<"\n";
      cin>>takein[i].number;
    };
    return takein;
};

void give(contact_info * takein){
    for (int i = 0; i < 2; i++)
      cout<<"Name:"<<takein[i].name<<"\n"<<"Number:"<<takein[i].number;
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    contact_info takein[2];
    // pass takein as an array
    take(takein);
    give(takein);
    return 0;
}
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Secret's out! Arrays are pointers. Or at least, they implicitly convert to them. Even it you did have the right type, you'd be using undefined behavior, as the array is allocated on a place on the stack that no longer exists.

I'll assume you actually want to 'return two things', otherwise Alec's answer is perfectly valid.

Try a vector, or a 2 element struct. People often struggle mentally with the notion of creating a struct only to serve as a return value, but it's worth it from a maintainability standpoint. You get the power of naming the type and naming its contents, and that self-documents your intent.

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In the main function takein is a variable of type contact_info and here takein=take(); you are trying assign an array to a normal variable.

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