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First of all I am using node.js with sequelize ORM and postgre SQL.

I have 2 simple questions:

  1. Every time I rerun my node application sequelize is dropping and creating all tables in database. How to prevent it from doing that (I don't want my records in database to be deleted)? I have tried to set my NODE_ENV to test but it didn't help.

  2. How does sequelize migration knows where it stopped (which migration have executed and which not). When I was using database migration in Grails framework for example it automatically created table in database where it kept all migration timestamps that executed before and when I rerun my application it looks at that table and knows which migrations are already done and which are not. I don't see any table when using node/sequelize, so how it works? :)

Thanks, Ivan

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Can you include some code? I'm using sequelize with postgresql and haven't had that problem. –  MikeSmithDev Jan 2 at 14:08
    
I copied they express example on sequelize.js web page and only put postgre database instead of mysql (like they did in example) github.com/sequelize/sequelize-expressjs-example (link of their example) –  ivan_zd Jan 2 at 15:22
    
I figured out. They put sync: { force: true } in some part of code in app.js and that override my sync (false) that I defined when connecting to database...now second question is all that bothers me :) –  ivan_zd Jan 2 at 17:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As you already figured out, the tables are being dropped because you are doing

sequelize.sync({ force: true })

The force true part being the culprit

To your second question - the state of migrations is saved in a table in your db - i believe it's called sequelize_meta

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