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I have declared the string array in my code as follows.

char *arr[] ={ 
"xyz",
"abc",
"pqr",
NULL
};

When compile then got following warning

warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*'' 

i know that "xyz" and other string literal are const char and my array is char* so have resolve it by declaring my array const char* arr but i loss the control to point this array in another pointer. So to resolve above issue have declared array as follows

 char *arr[] ={ 
    (char *)"xyz",
    (char *)"abc",
    (char *)"pqr",
    NULL
    };

But this type of declaration not fair when need large array (more then 100 string array). So any one have idea to resolve it by another way.

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3  
You have tagged this C++ (which is not the same language as C), so why not use a std::vector of std::strings? –  JBentley Jan 2 at 12:59
    
The error message comes from a C++ compiler: this is valid in C but not in C++. –  ouah Jan 2 at 13:08
    
yes std:string is perfectly valid –  Jayesh Jan 2 at 13:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't lose any re-pointing options by making the array a const char* arr[]. Note that there's a huge difference between const char * p (a mutable pointer to an immutable char) and a char * const p (an immutable pointer to a mutable char). This code is perfectly valid:

const char *arr[] = {
  "xyz",
  "abc",
  "pqr",
  NULL
};

arr[1] = "ghi";

Live example

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There is a difference between a const char* and char *const if your array is a const char* you can still point it to another location but you cannot modify the elements it contains. The correct solution in this case is to make the array const char*.

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4  
I think you mean char * const for the second one. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 2 at 12:58
    
@sftrabbit of course. Thank you. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 2 at 13:00
    
no requirements for modifying it but require to traverse it by pointing it to another pointer. Have also tried it by declaring const char* but it cause the error at line where i assign address of above array to another pointer. –  Jayesh Jan 2 at 13:01
    
@user3150853 is the pointer you assign to of another type? For instance if you try to point this array to an array of type char * [] you will not succeed. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 2 at 13:02
    
for example have assign above array to another char pointer like char *pp = arr. –  Jayesh Jan 2 at 13:08
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String literals are constant, so you need const pointers to refer to them:

const char *arr[] = {
    // whatever
};

Historically, it used to be possible (but dangerous) to convert string literals to non-const char*, for compatibility with ancient code that didn't know about const. This conversion has been deprecated for many years, and finally removed from the language in 2011.

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I don't think this post addresses the question OP apparently knows about const char* and literals but has problems using this type. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 2 at 13:03
    
@IvayloStrandjev: If that is the case, the solution will depend very much on why there are "problems" with const char*; and should probably be solved by addressing those "problems", not by subverting the type system. –  Mike Seymour Jan 2 at 13:17
    
I agree. The question does not contain enough information to give a complete answer. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 2 at 13:19
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