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I found this as the only java form of Sapphire II code. I can encrypt but I seem to be missing something to decrypt the file.

Source: Is this Sapphire II 8192?

Any ideas what is going wrong?

package sapphire;

import static java.util.Objects.hash;

/**
 *
 * @author john
 */
public class Sapphire {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO code application logic here
        int a = 2;
        byte[] aKey = new byte[a];
        byte[] hash = new byte[a];
        byte[] hash1 = new byte[a];
        byte[] hash2 = new byte[a];
        for (int i = 0; i < a; i++) {
            aKey[i] = (byte) (1);
            hash[i] = (byte) (1);

        }
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            hash[i] = (byte) i;
            System.out.println(hash[i]+" a ");
        }

        hash1 = hash;
        SapphireC sapphireC = new SapphireC(aKey);
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            System.out.println(hash[i]+" b ");
        }
        hash = sapphireC.hashFinal(hash);
        hash1 = hash;
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            System.out.println(hash[i]+" c ");
        }
        sapphireC.burn();
        hash = sapphireC.dehashFinal(hash);
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            System.out.println(hash[i]+" d ");
        }
//        for (int j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < aKey.length; i++) {

            System.out.println(hash[i] + " ");
//            System.out.println(hash2[i] + " ");
            System.out.println(hash1[i] + " ");
        }



//        }

    }

}


package sapphire;


public class SapphireC {

    /**
     * Construct a Sapphire Stream Cipher from a key, possibly null or empty.
     */
    public SapphireC(byte[] aKey) {
        byte[] key = aKey;
        if (key == null) {
            key = new byte[0];
        }
        cards = new int[256];
        if (key.length > 0) {
            initialize(key);
        } else {
            hashInit();
        }
    }

//    public SapphireC(byte[] aKey) {
//        byte[] key = aKey;
//        if (key == null) {
//            key = new byte[0];
//        }
//        cards = new int[256];
//        if (key.length > 0) {
//            deinitialize(key);
//        } else {
//            hashInit();
//        }
//    }

    /**
     * Decipher a single byte, presumably the next.
     *
     * @param b the next byte to decipher
     */
    public byte cipher(byte b) {
        // Picture a single enigma rotor with 256 positions, rewired
        // on the fly by card-shuffling.

        // This cipher is a variant of one invented and written
        // by Michael Paul Johnson in November, 1993.
        // Shuffle the deck a little more.
        // Convert from a byte to an int, but prevent sign extension.
        // So -16 becomes 240
        int bVal = b & 0xFF;
        ratchet += cards[rotor++];
        // Keep ratchet and rotor in the range of 0-255
        // The C++ code relied upon overflow of an unsigned char
        ratchet &= 0xFF;
        rotor &= 0xFF;
        int swaptemp = cards[lastCipher];
        cards[lastCipher] = cards[ratchet];
        cards[ratchet] = cards[lastPlain];
        cards[lastPlain] = cards[rotor];
        cards[rotor] = swaptemp;
        avalanche += cards[swaptemp];
        // Keep avalanche in the range of 0-255
        avalanche &= 0xFF;

        // Output one byte from the state in such a way as to make it
        // very hard to figure out which one you are looking at.
        lastPlain = bVal ^ cards[(cards[ratchet] + cards[rotor]) & 0xFF]
                ^ cards[cards[(cards[lastPlain] + cards[lastCipher] + cards[avalanche]) & 0xFF]];

        lastCipher = bVal;

        // Convert back to a byte
        // E.g. 240 becomes -16
        return (byte) lastPlain;
    }

//    I think this is sort of right.
    public byte decipher(byte b) {
        // Picture a single enigma rotor with 256 positions, rewired
        // on the fly by card-shuffling.

        // This cipher is a variant of one invented and written
        // by Michael Paul Johnson in November, 1993.
        // Shuffle the deck a little more.
        // Convert from a byte to an int, but prevent sign extension.
        // So -16 becomes 240
        int bVal = b & 0xFF;
        ratchet += cards[rotor++];
        // Keep ratchet and rotor in the range of 0-255
        // The C++ code relied upon overflow of an unsigned char
        ratchet &= 0xFF;
        rotor &= 0xFF;
        int swaptemp = cards[ lastPlain];
        cards[ lastPlain] = cards[ratchet];
        cards[ratchet] = cards[lastCipher];
        cards[lastCipher] = cards[rotor];
        cards[rotor] = swaptemp;
        avalanche += cards[swaptemp];
        // Keep avalanche in the range of 0-255
        avalanche &= 0xFF;

        // Output one byte from the state in such a way as to make it
        // very hard to figure out which one you are looking at.
        lastCipher = bVal ^ cards[(cards[ratchet] + cards[rotor]) & 0xFF]
                ^ cards[cards[(cards[lastCipher] + cards[lastPlain] + cards[avalanche]) & 0xFF]];

        lastPlain = bVal;

        // Convert back to a byte
        // E.g. 240 becomes -16
        return (byte) lastCipher;
    }

    public void burn() {
        // Destroy the key and state information in RAM.
        for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
            cards[i] = 0;
        }
        rotor = 0;
        ratchet = 0;
        avalanche = 0;
        lastPlain = 0;
        lastCipher = 0;
    }

    /**
     * @param hash
     */
    public byte[] hashFinal(byte[] hash) // Destination
    {
        for (int i = 255; i >= 0; i--) {
            cipher((byte) i);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            hash[i] = cipher((byte) 0);
        }
        return hash;
    }
    public byte[] dehashFinal(byte[] hash) // Destination
    {
        for (int i = 255; i >= 0; i--) {
            decipher((byte) i);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < hash.length; i++) {
            hash[i] = decipher((byte) 0);
        }
        return hash;
    }

    /**
     * Initializes the cards array to be deterministically random based upon the
     * key.
     * <p>
     * Key size may be up to 256 bytes. Pass phrases may be used directly, with
     * longer length compensating for the low entropy expected in such keys.
     * Alternatively, shorter keys hashed from a pass phrase or generated
     * randomly may be used. For random keys, lengths of from 4 to 16 bytes are
     * recommended, depending on how secure you want this to be.</p>
     *
     * @param key used to initialize the cipher engine.
     */
    private void initialize(byte[] key) {

        // Start with cards all in order, one of each.
        for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
            cards[i] = i;
        }

        // Swap the card at each position with some other card.
        int swaptemp;
        int toswap = 0;
        keypos = 0;         // Start with first byte of user key.
        rsum = 0;
        for (int i = 255; i >= 0; i--) {
            toswap = keyrand(i, key);
            swaptemp = cards[i];
            cards[i] = cards[toswap];
            cards[toswap] = swaptemp;
        }

        // Initialize the indices and data dependencies.
        // Indices are set to different values instead of all 0
        // to reduce what is known about the state of the cards
        // when the first byte is emitted.
        rotor = cards[1];
        ratchet = cards[3];
        avalanche = cards[5];
        lastPlain = cards[7];
        lastCipher = cards[rsum];

        // ensure that these have no useful values to those that snoop
        toswap = 0;
        swaptemp = toswap;
        rsum = swaptemp;
        keypos = rsum;
    }
//    private void deinitialize(byte[] key) {
//
//        // Start with cards all in order, one of each.
//        for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
//            cards[i] = i;
//        }
//
//        // Swap the card at each position with some other card.
//        int swaptemp;
//        int toswap = 0;
//        keypos = 0;         // Start with first byte of user key.
//        rsum = 0;
//        for (int i = 255; i >= 0; i--) {
//            toswap = keyrand(i, key);
//            swaptemp = cards[i];
//            cards[i] = cards[toswap];
//            cards[toswap] = swaptemp;
//        }
//
//        // Initialize the indices and data dependencies.
//        // Indices are set to different values instead of all 0
//        // to reduce what is known about the state of the cards
//        // when the first byte is emitted.
//        rotor = cards[1];
//        ratchet = cards[3];
//        avalanche = cards[5];
//        lastPlain = cards[7];
//        lastCipher = cards[rsum];
//
//        // ensure that these have no useful values to those that snoop
//        toswap = 0;
//        swaptemp = toswap;
//        rsum = swaptemp;
//        keypos = rsum;
//    }

    /**
     * Initialize non-keyed hash computation.
     */
    private void hashInit() {

        // Initialize the indices and data dependencies.
        rotor = 1;
        ratchet = 3;
        avalanche = 5;
        lastPlain = 7;
        lastCipher = 11;

        // Start with cards all in inverse order.
        int j = 255;
        for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
            cards[i] = j--;
        }
    }

    private int keyrand(int limit, byte[] key) {
        int u; // Value from 0 to limit to return.

        if (limit == 0) {
            return 0;   // Avoid divide by zero error.
        }

        int retry_limiter = 0; // No infinite loops allowed.

        // Fill mask with enough bits to cover the desired range.
        int mask = 1;
        while (mask < limit) {
            mask = (mask << 1) + 1;
        }

        do {
            // Convert a byte from the key to an int, but prevent sign extension.
            // So -16 becomes 240
            // Also keep rsum in the range of 0-255
            // The C++ code relied upon overflow of an unsigned char
            rsum = (cards[rsum] + (key[keypos++] & 0xFF)) & 0xFF;

            if (keypos >= key.length) {
                keypos = 0;           // Recycle the user key.
                rsum += key.length;   // key "aaaa" != key "aaaaaaaa"
                rsum &= 0xFF;
            }

            u = mask & rsum;

            if (++retry_limiter > 11) {
                u %= limit;     // Prevent very rare long loops.
            }
        } while (u > limit);
        return u;
    }

    private int[] cards;
    private int rotor;
    private int ratchet;
    private int avalanche;
    private int lastPlain;
    private int lastCipher;
    private int keypos;
    private int rsum;
}
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migrated from crypto.stackexchange.com Jan 2 at 15:06

This question came from our site for software developers, mathematicians and others interested in cryptography.

    
From what I gathered from C++ code the decypher should end with ` // Output one byte from the state in such a way as to make it // very hard to figure out which one you are looking at. lastPlain = bVal ^ cards[(cards[ratchet] + cards[rotor]) & 0xFF] ^ cards[cards[(cards[lastCipher] + cards[lastPlain] + cards[avalanche]) & 0xFF]]; lastCipher = bVal; // Convert back to a byte // E.g. 240 becomes -16 return (byte) lastPlain ;` but this still does not work –  user1198289 Jan 8 at 22:44

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