Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

WCF makes it easy to call services synchronously or asynchronously, regardless of how the service is implemented. To accommodate clients using ChannelFactory, services can even define separate sync/async contract interfaces. For example:

public interface IFooService
{
    int Bar();
}

[ServiceContract(Name = "IFooService")]
public interface IAsyncFooService
{
    Task<int> BarAsync();
}

This allows the client to reference either contract version, and WCF translates the actual API calls automatically.

One drawback to providing both contract versions is that they must be kept in-sync. If you forget to update one, the client may receive a contract mismatch exception at runtime.

Is there an easy way to unit test the interfaces to ensure they match from a WCF metadata perspective?

share|improve this question
5  
Alternatively, it may be easiest to use T4 templates to generate the async contract rather than manually maintain both. –  Scott Wegner Jan 2 '14 at 17:53
1  
You can try to use Message as a Request and Response DTO, so your ServiceContract will be the same forever. Here's an example –  GSerjo Jan 3 '14 at 1:39
    
@GSerjo: That's a useful design choice which could avoid the need to evolve our APIs. Ours do not follow such a pattern though. –  Scott Wegner Jan 3 '14 at 16:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can retrieve the ContractDescription and use WsdlExporter to generate the WSDL. The output MetadataSet is XML serializable, so you can compare the representations for each contract version to ensure they match:

    [TestMethod]
    public void ContractsMatch()
    {
        // Arrange
        string expectedWsdl = this.GetContractString<IFooService>();

        // Act
        string actualWsdl = this.GetContractString<IAsyncFooService>();

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expectedWsdl, actualWsdl);
    }

    private string GetContractString<TContract>()
    {
        ContractDescription description = ContractDescription.GetContract(typeof(TContract));
        WsdlExporter wsdlExporter = new WsdlExporter();

        wsdlExporter.ExportContract(description);
        if (wsdlExporter.Errors.Any())
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException(string.Format("Failed to export WSDL: {0}", string.Join(", ", wsdlExporter.Errors.Select(e => e.Message))));
        }

        MetadataSet wsdlMetadata = wsdlExporter.GetGeneratedMetadata();

        string contractStr;
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        using (XmlWriter xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(stringBuilder))
        {
            wsdlMetadata.WriteTo(xmlWriter);
            contractStr = stringBuilder.ToString();
        }

        return contractStr;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for sharing! Technically I'd argue whether it's a unit-test or an integration test ;) –  BartoszKP Jan 8 '14 at 19:54
    
@BartoszKP - I would call it an integration test, but this looks like a good case for using such –  chiccodoro Jan 16 '14 at 10:47

Your own answer is great. As BartoszKP points out it is more of an integration test, but this might be the best fit. You could argue that comparing two units (interfaces) to each other is not a unit test by definition.

The advantage of your approach is that you can be sure to verify what WCF makes from your classes. If you only want to test your own code, you could do something like that:

[TestMethod]
public void ContractsMatch()
{
    var asyncMethodsTransformed = typeof(IAsyncFooService)
        .GetMethods()
        .Select(mi => new 
        { 
            ReturnType = mi.ReturnType,
            Name = mi.Name,
            Parameters = mi.GetParameters()
        });
    var syncMethodsTransformed = typeof(IFooService)
        .GetMethods()
        .Select(mi => new
        {
            ReturnType = WrapInTask(mi.ReturnType),
            Name = Asyncify(mi.Name),
            Parameters = mi.GetParameters()
        });

    Assert.That(asyncMethodsTransformed, Is.EquivalentTo(syncMethodsTransformed));
}

The idea is that for each method in your IFooService you expect a method which has a similar signature with clearly defined transformations:

  • The name must contain a "Async" after the "I"
  • The return type must be a Task of the type found in the sync version.

The WrapInTask and Asyncify are left as exercise :-) If you like this suggestion I can expand on them.

By using a test like that you might constrain the code more than WCF does (I don't know the Async support very well). But even if it does you might want that to ensure some code consistency.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good approach too. The downside is that it requires an understanding of how particular members contribute to the WSDL definition and how async interfaces are translated. For example, an interface which passes this test would still fail at runtime because the ServiceContract Name doesn't match. There are more fields which must also match that I didn't find until exporting the WSDL metadata. –  Scott Wegner Jan 15 '14 at 16:35
    
@Scott: I see :-( you could still consider investigating all those properties and proofing them in a generic way - I am not sure though how much advantage this would have over the integration-test approach you mentioned. If you ever go for a framework other than WCF your interfaces and classes will have to change anyway, so making your tests depend on the framework looks ok to me here –  chiccodoro Jan 16 '14 at 10:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.