Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a little script with a nested "for" loop in perl. As I'm learning, at first I've done 3 for loops and it worked well. In order to make something more intelligent, I'd like to nested them but I don't know what is wrong.

If my input text is ABCDEFGHI I'd like to obtain

text 1 ABC DEF GHI
text 2 BCD EFG HI
text 3 CDE FGH I

But instead of it, my output is

text1 ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI ABC DEF GHI
text2 BCD EFG HI BCD EFG HI BCD EFG HI
text3 CDE FGH I

Here is my script. I'm using perl 5.18.1.

use Modern::Perl '2013';

my @text1;
my @text2;
my @text3;

my $entry = shift;
my $len = length $entry;

for (my $i = 2; $i < $len; $i += 3) {
    for (my $i = 1; $i < $len; $i += 3) {
        for (my $i = 0; $i < $len; $i += 3) {
            my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
            push @text1, uc($text);
        }
        my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
        push @text2, uc($text);
    }
    my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
    push @text3, uc($text);
}

say "text1 @text1";
say "text2 @text2";
say "text3 @text3";

I've already taken a look around and here http://perldoc.perl.org/perlsyn.html#For-Loops

Thank you for any help

share|improve this question
    
I'm assuming you're just trying to learn more? If that's the case you should know that nested for loops are something you should try to avoid if possible, they only make your programs run much slower. It's possible to do what you're trying to do with just one loop. –  Carl Anderson Jan 2 '14 at 17:13
    
What makes you think that the inner loop should nor execute 27 times? –  Arkadiy Jan 2 '14 at 17:16
    
Yes. I'm trying to learn more. I thought 3 independent loops was not very intelligent. So, thank you for your advice! –  Tetraodienne Jan 2 '14 at 17:16
    
@Arkadiy Everytime the more outer loop starts, the inners loops re-starts... but can't figure out what to do. –  Tetraodienne Jan 2 '14 at 17:18
1  
@Tetraodienne "Not very intelligent" isn't really the criterion you want to be using here; rather, "gets the job done" will serve you much better. (Nested loops are also to be avoided in general, where possible, because of their complexity cost. Consider an outer loop which runs ten times, and an inner loop which runs ten times; the process as a whole has to go through 100 iterations to complete the outer loop. Now consider an outer loop which runs ten times, and an inner loop which runs ten thousand times...) –  Aaron Miller Jan 2 '14 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

I don't know why you'd want three nested loops (not counting substr). You only need two: One loop to determine the starting position, and one to walk through the string.

my $text = uc('ABCDEFGHI');
for my $offset (0..2) {
   my @parts;
   for (my $i=$offset; $i<length($text); $i+=3) {
      push @parts, substr($work, $i, 3);
   }

   say "@parts";
}

Or without substr. to truly demonstrate there are really only two loops:

my $text = uc('ABCDEFGHI');
my @text = split //, $text;
for my $offset (0..2) {
   my @parts;
   for my $i ($offset..$#text) {
      $parts[ ($i - $offset) / 3 ] .= $text[$i];
   }

   say "@parts";
}

Personally, I'd use

my $text = uc('ABCDEFGHI');
for (1..3) {
   my @parts = $text =~ /\G.{1,3}/sg;
   say "@parts";

   $text =~ s/^.//s;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess it is a matter of personal preferences when using print(..)? It is very uncommon for perl. –  Сухой27 Jan 2 '14 at 17:25
    
@mpapec, As oppose to what? –  ikegami Jan 2 '14 at 17:26
    
print "" is more common than print("") –  Сухой27 Jan 2 '14 at 17:27
    
@mpapec, You can omit parens from sub and function calls, but it's dangerous. For example, print(($x+$y)/2) is not the same as print ($x+$y)/2. –  ikegami Jan 2 '14 at 17:28
    
Not when using warnings? perl -we 'print (3+3)/2' –  Сухой27 Jan 2 '14 at 17:30

Your three loops do not need to be nested to get your desired output:

use Modern::Perl '2013';

my @text1;
my @text2;
my @text3;

my $entry = shift;
my $len = length $entry;

for (my $i = 0; $i < $len; $i += 3) {
   my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
   push @text1, uc($text);
}

for (my $i = 1; $i < $len; $i += 3) {
   my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
   push @text2, uc($text);
}

for (my $i = 2; $i < $len; $i += 3) {        
    my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
    push @text3, uc($text);
}

say "text1 @text1";
say "text2 @text2";
say "text3 @text3";

You could also re-factor this a little, using two nested loops:

use Modern::Perl '2013';

my @texts = ( [], [], [] );

my $entry = shift;
my $len = length $entry;

for ( my $start = 0; $start < 3; $start++ ) {
  for ( my $i = $start; $i < $len; $i += 3 ) {
     my $text = substr($entry, $i, 3);
     push @{$texts[$start]}, uc($text);
  }
}

for ( my $start = 0; $start < 3; $start++ ) {
  say "text${start} @{$texts[$start]}";
}

As an aside: If you do nest for loops, it will be easier to read and understand your code if you use a different variable as the iterator. The three $i variables you have will work, but I had to check quite a while to make sure that wasn't your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
yes my 3 loops do work well! I'll try your advice too –  Tetraodienne Jan 2 '14 at 17:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.