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With the MvvmLight toolkit (v. 4.0.23.3), we have an issue with the following situation in which a subclass and a superclass both unregister for the same message when happening to have the same method name for their action. In the example below, the superclass will have the surprising side-effect of unregistering the subclass' action as well as its own (well, we were surprised by it).

We made a local change to the MvvmLight toolkit that seems to work just fine (I detail that change, below). The questions are: 1) is this change likely to cause any conflicts or problems that we have yet to observe? 2) is there a better or more reasonable way to accomplish the same effect? 3) would this change be reasonable to incorporate into the distributed MvvmLight source?

public class MySuperClass
{
    public MySuperClass()
    {
        if(SomethingHasNotHappened)
            Messenger.Default.Register<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, OnSomethingHappened);
    }

    private void OnSomethingHappened(SomethingHappenedMessage M)
    {
        // do some stuff, then...
        Messenger.Default.Unregister<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, OnSomethingHappened);
    }
}


public class MySubClass : MySuperClass
{
    public MySubClass()
    {
        if (SomethingHasNotHappened)
            Messenger.Default.Register<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, OnSomethingHappened);
    }

    private void OnSomethingHappened(SomethingHappenedMessage M)
    {
        // do some stuff, then...
        Messenger.Default.Unregister<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, OnSomethingHappened);
    }
}

We made the following two changes in order to resolve this:

in Messenger.cs, in private static void UnregisterFromLists<TMessage>, we changed the line of the 'if' statement identifying the message from comparing method names to comparing methods.

from

if (weakActionCasted != null
    && recipient == weakActionCasted.Target
    && (action == null
        | action.**Method.Name** == weakActionCasted.**MethodName**)
    && (token == null
        || token.Equals(item.Token)))

to

if (weakActionCasted != null
    && recipient == weakActionCasted.Target
    && (action == null
        | action.**Method** == weakActionCasted.**Method**)
    && (token == null
        || token.Equals(item.Token)))

and in WeakAction.cs:

from

protected MethodInfo Method
{
    get;
    set;
}

to

public MethodInfo Method
{
    get;
    protected set;
}

I see that the code around there hasn't changed in more recent 4.0.* updates, other than a #if NETFX_CORE in Messenger.cs.

In our real case, the subclass and superclass in the example are separated by several intermediate classes in our hierarchy. It seems an undue burden to expect all descendant classes to know what the ancestor classes are naming their private message-handling methods (and v/v for any ancestor class to know what all of its descendant classes are naming their private methods -- indeed, in our case, it was the ancestor class that added message handling for the specific event and with the specific method name after the descendant class had been doing so).

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1 Answer 1

The Register and Unregister methods have an overload where the 2nd parameter is object token. You can use this token to differentiate the instances of the message. What we commonly do is create an Enumerator that holds the different tokens. For example:

Have Enumerator:

public enum Tokens
{
    ViewModel1,
    ViewModel2
}

Then Add Tokens To Your Register and Unregister implementations:

public class MySuperClass
{
    public MySuperClass()
    {
        if(SomethingHasNotHappened)
            Messenger.Default.Register<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, Tokens.ViewModel1 OnSomethingHappened);
    }

    private void OnSomethingHappened(SomethingHappenedMessage M)
    {
        // do some stuff, then...
        Messenger.Default.Unregister<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, Tokens.ViewModel1, OnSomethingHappened);
    }
}


public class MySubClass : MySuperClass
{
    public MySubClass()
    {
        if (SomethingHasNotHappened)
            Messenger.Default.Register<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, Tokens.ViewModel2, OnSomethingHappened);
    }

    private void OnSomethingHappened(SomethingHappenedMessage M)
    {
        // do some stuff, then...
        Messenger.Default.Unregister<SomethingHappenedMessage>(this, Tokens.ViewModel2, OnSomethingHappened);
    }
}

And when you send the Message make sure to include the token:

Messenger.Default.Send<SomethingHappenedMessage>(SomethingHappenedMessageInstance, Tokens.ViewModel);

or

Messenger.Default.Send<SomethingHappenedMessage>(SomethingHappenedMessageInstance, Tokens.ViewMode2);
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the reply! sounds like we'd have to do this for every place in an inheritance hierarchy where we happen to use the same name, and then everywhere we happen to send that message. it would be easier to change the names of the methods, but i'd like to keep the private details of the classes private, even though they are connected by an inheritance relationship. either would be hard to maintain, i'd say, requiring a global view of the privately-scoped details of code. –  dtm Jan 2 at 20:43

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