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I'm playing around with an eager-initializing generic singleton class. The idea is that you inherit publicly from the class like so:

class foo : public singleton<foo> { };

I've learned a lot in the process but I'm stuck right now because it's breaking my Visual Studio 2008 linker. The problem is with the static instance member and/or its initialization.

template<class T>
class singleton {
    singleton();
    singleton(singleton const &);
    singleton & operator = (singleton const &);
public:
    static T & instance;
};
template<class T> T & T::instance;

Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

EDIT:

With this class declaration...

template<class T>
class singleton {
    singleton();
    singleton(singleton const &);
    singleton & operator = (singleton const &);
public:
    static T instance;
};
template <class T> T singleton<T>::instance;

When I try to do this...

class foo : public singleton<foo> { };

I get this error...

error C2248: 'singleton::singleton' : cannot access private member declared in class 'singleton'

...

This diagnostic occurred in the compiler generated function 'foo::foo(void)'

My interpretation is that singleton wants to construct a foo object which, by inheritance, depends on the construction of a singleton whose constructor is private. I figured singleton would have access to its own constructor but I guess not. Any ideas?

EDIT 2:

I've realized that the approach of inheriting from singleton<T> has the problem of requiring change to the class to be used as a singleton. I've ended up with the following code for my eager-initializing singleton class template.

template<typename T>
class singleton_wrapper {
    singleton_wrapper();
    singleton_wrapper(singleton_wrapper const &);
    singleton_wrapper & operator = (singleton_wrapper const &);
    static T instance;
    template<typename T> friend T & singleton();
};
template<typename T> T singleton_wrapper<T>::instance;

template<typename T>
T & singleton() {
    return singleton_wrapper<T>::instance;
}

For class...

class foo {
public:
    void bar() { }
};

...One would access a single instance of it (initialized before main()) using the following:

singleton<foo>().bar();

Thanks again for the help, especially GMan. I'm very pleased with my first experience on stack*overflow*.

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1  
I've recently decided (*cough* jalf *cough*) to advise against making a singleton class. Global variables do work fine, without the same restrictions. For a learning exercise, please continue! But I've been convinced they are never really necessary. –  GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 20:42
    
Singletons are supposed to solve the undefined-iconstruction-order problem (i.e. you can't be sure what order globals are constructed in, so one global object which uses another can't be sure the object it's using is initialized) and also enforce that there is only ever a single instance. (There's nothing stopping you from declaring another global.) –  Mike DeSimone Jan 18 '10 at 21:30
    
@Mike: I'm well aware of static initialization problems. A global function has the same effect without the mess. When have you ever required a class not be instantiated more than once? –  GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 23:31
    
For your edit, singleton does have access to its constructor. But it's not the one trying to construct. foo has to construct its base, the singleton, and cannot access the constructor. singleton needs to make foo it's friend. Add this in the class: friend T;, allowing all T's to construct the singleton. –  GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 23:42
    
Oh wow, I had tried friend class T; and then read about how the standard explicitly forbids that but then I never tried friend T. Thank you! –  Nick Strupat Jan 18 '10 at 23:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can't, since you don't have a concrete instance. You can need to create an actual instance that you can refer to:

template <class T>
class singleton {
    ...
private:
    static T instance_;
public:
    static T& instance;
};
template <class T> T singleton<T>::instance_;
template <class T> T& singleton<T>::instance = singleton<T>::instance;

Or, more simply, just ditch the reference altogether:

template <class T>
class singleton {
    ...
public:
    static T instance;
};
template <class T> T singleton<T>::instance;
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Could you please improve your answer? What question does "You can't" answer? –  HelloGoodbye Apr 16 '13 at 9:39

Off-the-sleeve: change instance to be of type 'T' instead of 'T &'.

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