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I'm very new to dealing with pointers, and my C knowledge is fairly small. I'm trying to understand pointers. I wrote the following code to print a list of variables (a to f) like so:

0
1
2
3
4
5

I wrote the following code to do this:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(){
  int a,b,c,d,e,f;
  int *p;
  int i;
  a = b = c = d = f = 0;
  p = &a;
  for (i = 0; i < 5; i++){
    *p += i;
    printf("%d\n", *p);
    p++;
  }
  return 0;
}

The idea was it works through the variables and increments each by an ever-increasing number (i). I am assuming that as you initialize the variables at the same time, they'd be placed next to each other in memory. However, I get the following output:

0
1
2
3
-1218283607

If I change the for loop to only go from 0 to 3 (i < 4), it works fine, printer 0 1 2 and 3. But when I wish to print the variable f as well, it doesn't seem to set it.

As I said, I'm very new to pointers so I've probably overlooked something silly, but I've been looking through my code over and over, trying to work it out.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Thank you all very much :) it was just my ignorance about variables in memory then. I'll read more into it, thank you all for the help. – mjp Jan 18 '10 at 21:45
up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no guarantee that a, b, c, d, e and f will be adjacent in memory. If you want that sort of guarantee you need to use an array.

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int a[6];
    int *p;
    int i;
    a[0] = a[1] = a[2] = a[3] = a[4] = a[5] = 0;
    p = &a[0];
    for (i = 0; i < 6; i++){
        *p += i;
        p++;
    }
    for(i = 0; i < 6; i++) {
        printf("%d\n", a[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

Here int a[6] is declaring an array named a that can hold six integers. These six integers can obtained via a[0], a[1], a[2], a[3], a[4] and a[5]. You are guaranteed that a[0], a[1], a[2], a[3], a[4] and a[5] are layed out contiguously in memory. Thus the line

p = &a[0];

sets p to the address of the first element. Each increment of this pointer moves us forward one position in the array.

The second for loop shows that first for loops correctly sets a[i] to i for i in {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. If you run this program you will see

0
1
2
3 
4
5

on the console.

share|improve this answer

You forgot to initialize e. But yes, use a packed array.

share|improve this answer

It isn't safe to assume that stack variables are arranged in memory in any particular order.

You need to use an array, a struct or possibly a union to gurantee the ordering of your ints.

union {
   int ary[6];
   struct {
      int a;
      int b;
      int c;
      int d;
      int e;
      int f;
      } s;
   } u = {0};

  p = &u.s.a;
  for (i = 0; i < 5; i++){
    *p += i;
    printf("%d\n", *p);
    p++;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Even in the code above, there is nothing stopping a compiler from inserting padding between a and b, and b and c, and, .... – Alok Singhal Jan 18 '10 at 21:45
    
Compilers don't insert padding arbitrarily. – John Knoeller Jan 18 '10 at 22:31
    
Of course not, but that doesn't invalidate @Alok's comment. – jason Jan 19 '10 at 1:40
    
it's about what's allowed by the standard. One could argue that the most logical thing for a compiler to do is to allocate storage for OP's a, b, ..., f sequentially, but of course, that's not required either. – Alok Singhal Jan 19 '10 at 1:50
    
I don't buy that. Compilers may be allowed to put spaces in there, but in practice, they can only do that if they are willing to break a lot of existing code for no good reason. In fact, what actual compilers do is go beyond the spec in providing syntax for programmers to be explicit in how they want structures to be packed - and choosing backward compatible defaults otherwise. – John Knoeller Jan 19 '10 at 2:51

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