Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose i have a custom wrapper around a primitive C++ type:

class myInt
{
    public:
        /*stuff here*/
    private:
        unsigned int data;
}

How can i make

myInt mi;  
if(mi){...}  

behave in a way you would expect from a normal integer?
All i can think of is to write an explicit boolean cast, or perhaps override operator==.
Something like:

if(bool(mi)){...}
if(mi.toBool()){...}
if(mi==true){..}

All these do serve the purpose but look quite ugly and artificial.
Is there another option i am missing?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can make your following cast operator, something like:

class myInt
{
    public:
        operator bool() const { return data != 0; }

    private:
        unsigned int data;
}

It is by default implicit (it means that it will be used every time the compiler finds it does need a bool and you provides a myInt). Since c++11 you can mark it as explicit, forcing the usage to be restricted to explicit cast, before that it was always implicit.

But you should note that it is often a bad idea and should be avoided: check the safe bool idiom for more lecture.

Another option close to your desire and a lot safer is the overload of the ! operator:

class myInt
{
    public:
        bool operator!() const { return data == 0; }

    private:
        unsigned int data;
}
share|improve this answer

The best option is to drop the wrapper altogether.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.