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I was passed a long running legacy ruby program, which has numerous occurances of

begin
  #dosomething
rescue Exception => e
  #halt the exception's progress
end

throughout it.

Without tracking down every single possible exception these each could be handling (at least not immediately), I'd still like to be able to shut it down at times with Ctrl-C.

And I'd like to do so in a way which only adds to the code (so I don't affect the existing behavior, or miss an otherwise caught exception in the middle of a run.)

[Ctrl-C is SIGINT, or SystemExit, which appears to be equivalent to SignalException.new("INT") in Ruby's exception handling system. "class SignalException < Exception", which is why this problem comes up.]

The code I would like to have written would be:

begin
  #dosomething
rescue SignalException => e
  raise e
rescue Exception => e
  #halt the exception's progress
end

EDIT: This code works, as long as you get the class of the exception you want to trap correct. That's either SystemExit, Interrupt, or IRB::Abort as below.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 61 down vote accepted

The problem is that when a Ruby program ends, it does so by raising SystemExit. When a control-C comes in, it raises Interrupt. Since both SystemExit and Interrupt derive from Exception, your exception handling is stopping the exit or interrupt in its tracks. Here's the fix:

Wherever you can, change

rescue Exception => e
  # ...
end

to

rescue StandardError => e
  # ...
end

for those you can't change to StandardError, re-raise the exception:

rescue Exception => e
  # ...
  raise
end

or, at the very least, re-raise SystemExit and Interrupt

rescue SystemExit, Interrupt
  raise
rescue Exception => e
  #...
end

Any custom exceptions you have made should derive from StandardError, not Exception.

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Wayne, would you be so kind as to add an IRB::Abort example to your list as well? –  Tim Snowhite Jan 19 '10 at 23:29
1  
@Tim, go find irb.rb (on my system, it's in /usr/lib/ruby/1.8/irb.rb) and find the main loop (search for @context.evaluate). Look at the rescue clauses and I think you'll understand why IRB is behaving the way it does. –  Wayne Conrad Jan 19 '10 at 23:50
    
thank you. Looking at the definition for #signal_handle in irb.rb helped my understanding as well. They have a neat trick within the main loop's the exception variable binding as well. (Using the rescue clauses as a way to pick out a specific exception, then using that exception outside of the rescue bodies.) –  Tim Snowhite Jan 20 '10 at 18:37

If you can wrap your whole program you can do something like the following:

 trap("SIGINT") { throw :ctrl_c }

 catch :ctrl_c do
 begin
    sleep(10)
 rescue Exception
    puts "Not printed"
 end
 end

This basically has ctrl-C use catch/throw instead of exception handling, so unless the existing code already has a catch :ctrl_c in it, it should be fine.

Alternatively you can do a trap("SIGINT") { exit! }. exit! exits immediately, it does not raise an exception so the code can't accidentally catch it.

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2  
Note that Ctrl-C in IRB sends IRB::Abort, not SIGINT. Otherwise @Logan's answer is a solution. –  Tim Snowhite Jan 19 '10 at 23:31
1  
@TimSnowhite for ruby interpreter SIGINT works fine for me. –  mlatu Jul 12 '12 at 7:29
1  
throw and catch must be on the same thread, so this won't work if you want to catch the Interrupt exception on another thread. –  Matt Connolly Dec 2 '13 at 6:00

If you can't wrap your whole application in a begin ... rescue block (e.g., Thor) you can just trap SIGINT:

trap "SIGINT" do
  puts "Exiting"
  exit 130
end

130 is a standard exit code.

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