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I am in the final stages of a SaaS application (Software as service) I am in a little bind that I don't know which route to take.

I need to check the current user's subscription level and see if they can use the resource they are trying to reach.

The way I am currently handling this (lack of experience) is that on every action that needs this check I'm hitting the repository and getting their subscription and making the decisions based on the returned data from SQL Server. I personally believe this is the worst way of doing this and don't like it.

I thought about making an action attribute that would make the check. Although I believe this is a better way to go (less code rewrite and maintenance) I'm thinking there must be a better way.

I also thought about making a helper and calling it every-time and storing the result in a session but I don't have much experience with sessions and have heard and read horror stories about it and azure (cloud platform in general)

Any Ideas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For this purposes I have AllowFor attribute. It looks like:

public class AllowFor : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private UserType userTypes = UserType.NotAuthenticated;

    public AllowFor(UserType userTypes)
    {
        this.userTypes = userTypes;
    }

    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        if (!(filterContext.Controller is ApplicationController))
            throw new Exception("AllowFor attribute is acceptable only for ApplicationController");

        var controller = (ApplicationController)filterContext.Controller;

        if (!userTypes.HasFlag(controller.CurrentUserType))
            filterContext.Result = new ViewResult
            {
                ViewName = "AccessRestricted"
            };
        else
            base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }
}

ApplicationController is just my class inherited from Contoller.

public abstract class Application : Controller
{
    public UserType CurrentUserType
    {
        get
        {
            return currentUser.UserType;
        }
    }

    // singleton for current user

    protected User __currentUser = null;
    protected User currentUser
    {
        get
        {
            if (__currentUser == null && HttpContext != null && HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            {
                // access to sql based on:
                // HttpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated
                // HttpContext.User.Identity.Name
                // etc
            }
            return __currentUser;
        }
    }

    // singleton for EF context

    private MyAppContext __context = null;
    protected MyAppContext context
    {
        get
        {
            if (__context == null)
            {
                __context = new MyAppContext();
            }
            return __context;
        }
    }
}

You don't need it actually, but I find it quite useful. Just inherit your controller from ApplicationContoller and you're able to retrieve context and other objects with singleton pattern.

The usage of attribute is very easy, just mark your action with attribute:

[Authorize, AllowFor(UserType.Company)]
public ActionResult Index()
{
    // ...
}

You can make your AllowFor attribute more useful and apply it to classes (controllers, for instance) instead of actions:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Class,
                AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = true)]
public class AllowFor : ActionFilterAttribute { ... }
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