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I created an Objective-C Singleton class. I have a few properties on the class, including a BOOL property. For some strange reason the BOOL variable that I declared "resets" itself to YES outside of the scope that is set in.

In the Singleton class's header, the BOOL is declared using @property with the following parameters:

@property (nonatomic, assign, readonly) BOOL shouldCryptData;

In the Singleton class's @interface in the implementation, I redefine the same property as readwrite (because I need it to be read only to outside classes, but read / write to my own).

@interface SingletonClassName ()
    @property (nonatomic, assign, readwrite) BOOL shouldCryptData;
@end

The BOOL property gets set during initialization of the singleton class. I am setting it like this inside one of the init methods. There are multiple init methods which specify whether or not data should be crypted or not - this is just one example of where it would be set. Only one of my init methods call super, all the others make a call to the main init.

- (id)init {
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // Brief setup code

        [self setShouldCryptData:NO]; // Have also tried using dot-notation and without *self*
        // I can confirm that the shouldCryptData property is NO (within the current scope) right after setting it in this method
    }
    return self;
}

Now, the odd part is that when I try to access shouldCryptData from any other method, it always returns YES. Why would it return YES after explicitly setting it to NO?

I'm not accessing it in any strange way, just like this:

if (self.shouldCryptData == YES) // Outside of the init method, this is ALWAYS true

I know I'm doing something wrong, but I can't figure it out. I feel like it has something to so with the singleton, but I'm not sure. It seems like neither Google, nor StackOverflow have any answers for this. Any ideas?


EDIT

Singleton implementation:

//-------- Header ---------------------//

@interface SingletonClassName : NSObject

+ (SingletonClassName *)sharedManager;

@end

//-------- Implementation ------------//

@implementation
+ (SingletonClassName *)sharedManager {
    static SingletonClassName *sharedManager = nil;

    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        if (sharedManager == nil) sharedManager = [[super allocWithZone:NULL] init];
    });

    return sharedManager;
}

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    return [self sharedManager];
}

- (id)copyWithZone:(NSZone *)zone {
    return self;
}
share|improve this question
3  
How are you making this a singleton? Are you sure that nothing else is setting it to YES? Place a breakpoint on the property declaration and it should break every time the property is read or written to –  Paul.s Jan 3 at 1:13
1  
The ivar is going to be NO when the instance is created. Where are you setting it to YES? In init? –  Josh Caswell Jan 3 at 1:16
1  
KVO may help here. –  KudoCC Jan 3 at 1:18
2  
You could also try setting a watch point on the variable, which will pause anytime the variable is changed. You can do this firstly setting a breakpoint in the init method of the singleton, and then by typing watchpoint set variable shouldCryptData in the debugger once you reach the breakpoint. –  Andy Jan 3 at 1:19
2  
You say you think the problem has something to so with the singleton, but you don't show the code for how you're creating it. Please edit you question to show that. –  rdelmar Jan 3 at 2:10

3 Answers 3

The simplest explanation is that you don't quite have a singleton, and you're setting that property on one instance, and reading it on another.

Try doing NSLog(@"%p", self) in all the methods where you set and access the property and make sure they're all the same.

Added:

This is my usual singleton logic:

+ (instancetype) sharedInstance {
    static MyClass *singleton;

    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        singleton = [[self alloc] init];
    });

    return singleton;
}

Invoke [MyClass sharedInstance] when you need it.

share|improve this answer
1  
It looks like you're right. I went through and added those logs to all of my methods. The SharedManager is on a different instance than all of the other methods. –  Sam Jan 3 at 15:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Figured out what was happening using a combination of suggestions from the answers and comments here. The best suggestion, by @Paul.s, was to place a breakpoint on the property declaration:

Are you sure that nothing else is setting it to YES? Place a breakpoint on the property declaration and it should break every time the property is read or written to

@Andy's comment was also helpful in figuring out what the issue was:

You could also try setting a watch point on the variable, which will pause anytime the variable is changed. You can do this firstly setting a breakpoint in the init method of the singleton, and then by typing watchpoint set variable shouldCryptData in the debugger once you reach the breakpoint.

I found that the init method was getting called multiple times, and each time with a different setting for the BOOL property, shouldCryptData.


Another suggestion from @noa helped clear up which instance the BOOL property was getting set on. I originally set it from the shared manager, but later set it in the init method because the sharedManager was on a different instance than the rest of the methods. Here's the relevant excerpt from the answer:

Try doing NSLog(@"%p", self) in all the methods where you set and access the property and make sure they're all the same.

So, it turns out that there were multiple issues:

  • The property was being set multiple times (with multiple unneeded calls to init)
  • Turns out that I was originally setting the property on a different instance
  • My singleton wasn't being correctly created (although that didn't really affect the property)
share|improve this answer

KVO is one of ways. I will give an example.

TestObject.h

@interface TestObject : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, assign) BOOL isIt ;
@end

TestObject.m

@implementation TestObject

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init] ;
    if (self) {
        [self addObserver:self forKeyPath:@"isIt" options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew|NSKeyValueObservingOptionOld context:nil] ;
    }
    return self ;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [self removeObserver:self forKeyPath:@"isIt"] ;
}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath ofObject:(id)object change:(NSDictionary *)change context:(void *)context
{
    if ([keyPath isEqualToString:@"isIt"]) {
        NSLog(@"%@", change) ; // add a breakpoint here, you will know where change the value
    } else {
        [super observeValueForKeyPath:keyPath ofObject:object change:change context:context] ;
    }
}

@end

You will get notification only if the property is set by dot-notation or setIsIt method.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's a lot of additional code, especially considering either my comment above or @Andy comment to the original question both hit a breakpoint without modifying the code –  Paul.s Jan 3 at 1:36
1  
@Paul.s These code don't change the original logic and it is a new way to debug. You can use it to observe changes of UIView's frame by the way. –  KudoCC Jan 3 at 1:42
2  
This is really the wrong tool for the job. –  Paul.s Jan 3 at 1:43
1  
@Paul.s It is good if it can find the problem. –  KudoCC Jan 3 at 1:53
1  
This is what debuggers are for. –  Josh Caswell Jan 3 at 2:25

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