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I have a bunch of data frames named Ldat.1, Ldat.2, etc., in my normal R environment that I can access interactively.

From the console, I can type:

> dim(Ldat.1)[1]
[1] 40
> dim(Ldat.2)[1]
[1] 39

So I can tell that the first has 40 rows and the second has 39 rows.

However, with dozens of data frames, I want to write a script to tell me how many rows are in each frame.

I tried the following:

print(dim(Ldat.1)[1])
print(dim(Ldat.2)[1])
for (i in 1:2){
  namex<-paste("Ldat.",i,sep="")
  size<-dim(.GlobalEnv$namex)
  print(size[1])
}

and the console showed:

> print(dim(Ldat.1)[1])
[1] 40
> print(dim(Ldat.2)[1])
[1] 39
> for (i in 1:2){
+   namex<-paste("Ldat.",i,sep="")
+   size<-dim(.GlobalEnv$namex)
+   print(size[1])
+ }
NULL
NULL

It's easy enough to construct the strings:

for (i in 1:2){
  namex<-paste("Ldat.",i,sep="")
  size<-dim(namex)
  print(namex)
}

produces:

> for (i in 1:2){
+   namex<-paste("Ldat.",i,sep="")
+   size<-dim(namex)
+   print(namex)
+ }
[1] "Ldat.1"
[1] "Ldat.2"

But despite trying various combinations of "as.data.frame" and "envir=" I can't seem to get R to interpret the string "Ldat.1" as meaning the name of an object accessible from the console.

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

for (i in 1:2){
   namex<-paste("Ldat.",i,sep="")
   size<-dim(.GlobalEnv[[namex]])
   print(size[1])
               }

The problem has nothing to do with environments and everything to do with the fact that $ does not evaluate its second argument (it's first argument being the token name that precedes it, .GlobalEnv in this case). There is no object in .GlobalEnv named "namex". On the other hand "[[" does an evaluation step, so the value of namex (which is "Ldat.1" during the first pass of the for-loop) will get substituted and lookup will succeed.

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That's perfect. Even though I try to practice my R skills, it's hard to improve without advice from an expert. Thanks. –  dataquerent Jan 3 at 2:04
    
If you wanted to use sapply you might then try: sapply( mget( ls(patt="Ldat.") ), NROW), which would also find Ldat.3 or Ldat.x –  BondedDust Jan 3 at 2:12

1) This will list the names of each data frame and the number of rows it has:

sapply(Filter(is.data.frame, mget(ls())), nrow)

If we already had nms, a vector of names of data frames, then we could reduce this to:

nms <- c("Ldat.1", "Ldat.2")
sapply(mget(nms), nrow)

2) Here is another way:

simplify2array(Filter(Negate(is.null), eapply(.GlobalEnv, nrow)))

3) Also try the ll function in the R.oo package.

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mget is one of those functions in R that you can just spend hours banging your head about a problem until you finally figure out that its what you need –  qwwqwwq Jan 3 at 1:51
1  
Those syntax elements are very interesting. I will be sure to write some test scripts to make sure that I understand them. Thank you - your information has broadened my R horizons quite a bit. –  dataquerent Jan 3 at 2:05

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