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I want to test that a method receives a block... but my rspec stub returns (no args).

Here is a contrived example...

class Foo
  def self.bar &block
  end
end

describe Foo do
  before do
    Foo.stub(:bar)
    Foo.bar { 'foo'}
  end
  it 'should' do
    expect(Foo).to have_received(:bar).with(kind_of(Proc))
  end
end

results in...

  1) Foo should
     Failure/Error: expect(Foo).to have_received(:bar).with(kind_of(Proc))
       <Foo (class)> received :bar with unexpected arguments
         expected: (#<RSpec::Mocks::ArgumentMatchers::KindOf:0x1022a7b20 @klass=Proc>)
              got: (no args)

EDIT

here is a less pointless example with Peter's solution implemented...

foo.rb

class Foo
  def self.setup &block
    @setup ||= block
  end
  def setup
    instance_eval &self.class.setup
  end
end

bar.rb

# DSL designed class
class Bar < Foo
  setup do
    # setup Bar instances here
  end
end

bar_spec.rb

# Need to make sure DSL classes are correctly implemented
describe Bar do
  after do
    load 'bar'
  end

  it 'should define .setup' do
    expect(Bar).to receive(:setup){ |&block| expect(block).to be_a(Proc) }
  end
end
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't believe there's any way to validate that a block was passed after the fact, but if you use the normal pre-execution expectations, you can check for it as follows:

class Foo
  def self.bar &block
    puts 'DO NOT RUN'
  end
end

describe 'Foo#bar' do
  it 'should confirm a block is passed' do
    expect(Foo).to receive(:bar) {|&block| expect(block).to be_a(Proc)}
    Foo.bar {}
  end
  it 'should confirm a block is not passed' do
    expect(Foo).to receive(:bar) {|&block| expect(block).to be_nil}
    Foo.bar
  end
end

If you don't mind actually yielding to the block, then you can use .and_yield, which will generate an expectation error if a block is not present.

class Foo
  def self.bar &block
  end
end

describe Foo do
  before do
    Foo.stub(:bar), y
  end
  it 'should' do
    expect(Foo).to receive(:bar).and_yield
    Foo.bar {}
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
true... this is due to it being a contrived example.... just imagine this test isn't pointless :) –  brewster Jan 3 '14 at 3:06
    
Sorry, I misread the question as using should receive rather than should have_received. I'll update my answer. –  Peter Alfvin Jan 3 '14 at 3:22
    
.and_yield works, but i want to prevent running the proc. I decided on stubbing Foo.stub to assign the block to a class var that i can check to be an instance of a proc. –  brewster Jan 3 '14 at 20:43
    
@brewster Would you mind posting what you ended up doing? I didn't understand it and I'd like to. I was thinking of generating a PR for RSpec to introduce a with_block method that would check for the existence of the block without invoking it and I'd like to understand any alternative. –  Peter Alfvin Jan 3 '14 at 20:59
    
Just saw your reply... I just added my workaround solution as another answer. A PR to rspec would be totally appropriate. I can workup a non-contrived example for how this would actually be useful if needed. –  brewster Jan 3 '14 at 21:16

To test that a block is called without having to run it and see if the yield fails, I decided on reopening the class and leveraging a class var. This is a temporary workaround, since (IMO) rspec should be responsible for this functionality.

class Foo
  def self.bar &block
    puts 'DO NOT RUN'
  end
end

describe Foo do
  before do
    class Foo
      def self.bar &block
        Foo.send(:class_variable_set, :@@bar_val, block)
      end
      Foo.bar {} # this line is dynamic in my real specs :)
    end
  end

  after :all do
    load 'foo' # to revert back to the original class
  end

  it 'should' do
    expect(Foo.send(:class_variable_get, :@@bar_val)).to be_a Proc
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. See my updated answer for yet another approach. –  Peter Alfvin Jan 3 '14 at 21:49

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