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I have a vector v and I would like to find the index of first changes in elements of a vector in R. How can I do this? For example

    v = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1.5, 1.5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

rle is a good idea, but if you only want the indices of the changepoints you can just do:

c(1,1+which(diff(v)!=0))
## 1 8 10
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You're looking for rle:

rle(v)
## Run Length Encoding
##   lengths: int [1:3] 7 2 5
##   values : num [1:3] 1 1.5 2

This says that the value changes at locations 7+1, 7+2+1 (and 7+2+5+1 would be the index of the element "one off the end")

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The data.table package internally (meaning not exported yet) uses a function uniqlist (in dev 1.8.11) or alternatively duplist (in current 1.8.10 @CRAN) that does exactly what you're after. It should be quite fast. Here's a benchmark:

require(data.table)
set.seed(45)
# prepare a huge vector (sorted)
x <- sort(as.numeric(sample(1e5, 1e7, TRUE)))

require(microbenchmark)
ben <- function(v) c(1,1+which(diff(v)!=0))
matthew <- function(v) rle(v)
matteo <- function(v) firstDiff(v)
exegetic <- function(v) first.changes(v)
# if you use 1.8.10, replace uniqlist with duplist
dt <- function(v) data.table:::uniqlist(list(v))

microbenchmark( ans1 <- ben(x), matthew(x), matteo(x), 
                exegetic(x), ans2 <- dt(x), times=10)

# Unit: milliseconds
#            expr       min         lq     median         uq        max neval
#  ans1 <- ben(x)  1181.808  1229.8197  1313.2646  1357.5026  1553.9296    10
#      matthew(x)  1456.918  1496.0300  1581.0062  1660.4067  2148.1691    10
#       matteo(x) 28609.890 29305.1117 30698.5843 32706.3147 34290.9864    10
#     exegetic(x)  1365.243  1546.0652  1576.8699  1659.5488  1886.6058    10
#   ans2 <- dt(x)   113.712   114.7794   143.9938   180.3743   221.8386    10

identical(as.integer(ans1), ans2) # [1] TRUE

I'm not that familiar with Rcpp, but seems like the solution could be improved quite a bit.

Edit: Refer to Matteo's updated answer for Rcpp timings.

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thanks for your realistic comparison. I've edited my code, which now makes justice to Rcpp. The problem was that I using push.back() on a NumericVector, rather than a C++ std::list. –  Matteo Fasiolo Mar 16 '14 at 12:21
> v <- c(1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6)

first.changes <- function(d) {
  p <- cumsum(rle(d)$lengths) + 1
  p[-length(p)]
}

> first.changes(v)
[1]  4  6 11 12 14

Or, with your data,

> v = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1.5, 1.5, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)

> first.changes(v)
[1]  8 10
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If you need the operation to be fast you can use the Rcpp package to call C++ from R:

library(Rcpp)
library(data.table)
library(microbenchmark)

# Rcpp solution
cppFunction('
NumericVector firstDiff(NumericVector & vett)
{
  const int N = vett.size();

  std::list<double> changes;
  changes.push_back(1.0);

  NumericVector::iterator iterH = vett.begin() + 1;
  NumericVector::iterator iterB = vett.begin();

  int count = 2;
  for(iterH = vett.begin() + 1; iterH != vett.end(); iterH++, iterB++)
  {
    if(*iterH != *iterB) changes.push_back(count);
    count++;
  }

  return wrap(changes);
 }
')

# Data table
dt <- function(input) data.table:::uniqlist(list(input))

# Comparison
set.seed(543)
x <- sort(as.numeric(sample(1e5, 1e7, TRUE)))
microbenchmark(ans1 <- firstDiff(x), which(diff(x) != 0)[1], rle(x),
               ans2 <- dt(x), times = 10) 

Unit: milliseconds
                   expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
    ans1 <- firstDiff(x)  50.10679  50.12327  50.14164  50.16343  50.28475    10
  which(diff(x) != 0)[1] 545.66478 547.58388 556.15550 561.78275 617.40281    10
                  rle(x) 664.53262 687.04316 709.84949 714.91528 721.37204    10
                   dt(x)  60.60317  82.30181  82.70207  86.13330  94.07739    10

identical(as.integer(ans1), ans2)
#[1] TRUE

Rcpp is slightly faster than data.table and much faster then the other alternatives in this example.

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1  
I'm quite certain that it's due to the copy during list(input). If you were to do: k = list(input) and then time uniqlist(k) I'm guessing it'd be the same. Starting from R v3.1 list(.) won't make a copy. So, it's a very welcoming change! –  Arun Mar 16 '14 at 12:45
    
Good point! You are exactly right, if you transform x to a list beforehand you get almost exactly the same time. –  Matteo Fasiolo Mar 16 '14 at 15:34

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