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I noticed that there are two attributes we can specify for EditText as an inputType

  1. textEmailAddress
  2. textWebEmailAddress

Google doc has explained very less about this.

We can understand that textWebEmailAddress is something related to HTML or WebView, but I would like to know what excatly it is.

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Not sure about the exact difference. A bit more info here.. developer.android.com/reference/android/text/… –  Kumar Bibek Jan 3 '14 at 6:09

3 Answers 3

Here are some resources I've found regarding these two inputTypes:

... For example, textEmailAddress is a text field where the user will enter something that is an e-mail address (foo@bar.com) so the key layout will have an '@' character in easy access...

This was found here.

And then:

...You can specify the type of keyboard you want for your EditText object with the android:inputType attribute. For example, if you want the user to input an email address, you should use the textEmailAddress input type...

This was found here.

And the only thing I can find on textWebEmailAddress is:

Variation of TYPE_CLASS_TEXT: entering e-mail address inside of a web form. This was added in HONEYCOMB. An IME must target this API version or later to see this input type; if it doesn't, a request for this type will be seen as TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_EMAIL_ADDRESS when passed through EditorInfo.makeCompatible(int).

This was found here.

From what I've seen in these sections, there is very little difference in the results, the keyboards are the same, just specified differently for different locations of inputs; one in a web form, one for general-purpose. Also the textWebEmailAddress is only effective for Honeycomb and newer platforms, while the regular is compatible for all. Although both could be used in older versions, per the documentation, but would operationally be a regular textEmailAddress anyways.

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Main purpose I think for these is to show keypad with . @ and .com keys. I tested it in samsung galaxy S5 it shows same keypad shown below.

enter image description here

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3  
Both tags indicates that EditText is expecting email address, so its obvious that we will have above kind of keyboard, for faster input. What I am not clear is to have two separate tags textEmailAddress and textWebEmailAddress –  Hardik Trivedi May 16 '14 at 4:54
    
this is not the correct answer –  NightSkyCode Oct 21 '14 at 12:16

Here are some resources I’ve found regarding these two inputTypes: … For example, textEmailAddress is a text field where the user will enter something that is an e-mail address (foo@bar.com) so the key layout will have an ‘@’ character in easy access… This was found here. And then: …You can specify the type of keyboard you want for your EditText object with the android:inputType attribute. For example, if you want the user to input an email address, you should use the textEmailAddress input type… This was found here. And the only thing I can find on textWebEmailAddress is: Variation of TYPE_CLASS_TEXT: entering e-mail address inside of a web form. This was added in HONEYCOMB. An IME must target this API version or later to see this input type; if it doesn’t, a request for this type will be seen as TYPE_TEXT_VARIATION_EMAIL_ADDRESS when passed through EditorInfo.makeCompatible(int). This was found here. From what I’ve seen in these sections, there is very little difference in the results, the keyboards are the same, just specified differently for different locations of inputs; one in a web form, one for general-purpose. Also the textWebEmailAddress is only effective for Honeycomb and newer platforms, while the regular is compatible for all. Although both could be used in older versions, per the documentation, but would operationally be a regular textEmailAddress anyways.

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4  
and... what is the difference? –  feresr Jan 30 at 15:47
    
My guess: textWebEmailAddress just gives the keyboard a little more contextual information to work with for auto-correct purposes. For example, if a user enters their email address into an app, they might provide their Google account email address. Whereas when entering an email address into a form in a web browser, maybe they use a throwaway email address or their work address or something. –  Joshua Carmody Feb 17 at 22:30
    
I apologise for the downvote, but I'm afraid you haven't answered the OP's question, especially considering the fact that he's said he's already looked at the docs. –  Abraham Philip Jun 4 at 23:57
    
See the updated answer hope it will help –  Rahul Jun 5 at 11:52

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