Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
var y=function(){
    return new y.prototype.greeting();
}
y.prototype={
    greeting:function(){
        alert("hello world");
    }
}

new y();

the above code will alert("hello world");

but if I remove the .prototype and change that line to return new y.greeting();

an error will be occurred:

undefined is not a function

var y=function(){
    return new y.greeting();
}
y.prototype={
    greeting:function(){
        alert("hello world");
    }
}

new y();

why I can't call the greeting method without prototype here?

thanks a lot

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps you should include a full sample of your "prototype-less" code, rather than just saying which bits you have removed – musefan Jan 3 '14 at 9:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

y is a function, the [[Prototype]] of which is Function - so when you ask the interpreter to look up y.greeting for you, it first looks at y itself, then it checks Function.prototype and then it checks Object.prototype.

When you create a new y then the prototype property of y will be set on the object that is created. So if you did new (new y()).greetings() then you would get your alert.

Another way to think about it is the prototype property of a constructor function is the prototype of any child objects that will be created by calling new constructor. The actual internal [[Prototype]] of the constructor will always be based on whatever constructed it.

You can see this in the example I put together below. Object.getPrototypeOf will return the internal [[Prototype]] property, so we can see what is actually going on:

> var test = function() {}
> Object.getPrototypeOf(test)
function Empty() {}

// Setting the prototype property
// does not change the [[Prototype]] of test
> test.prototype = {x: 1}
> Object.getPrototypeOf(test)
function Empty() {}

// But it *does* change the prototype of
// objects *created by* test.
> var x = new test
> Object.getPrototypeOf(x)
Object {x: 1}
share|improve this answer

return new y.greeting(); tries to access an attribute (function) of y which doesn't really exist. That's why it throws the error 'undefined is not a function' because, the attribute of y contains a variable which contains a function. It's like three floors, where you cannot go to ground floor from the second floor without going to first floor; kind of hierarchy. Got it?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.