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If I have a List that I want to trim to save memory, I seem to be able to set the list capacity and then wait for GC to free the memory. When the List gets promoted to the next generation, the memory allocated for it appears to be a function of the list's capacity, rather than the memory originally allocated. This saves me copying explicitly, and ultimately means 1 less copy in total.

var x = new List<double>(50000000) { 1, 2, 3 };
//Lots of memory used here
GC.Collect(2);
//Still lots of memory used
x.Capacity = 3;
GC.Collect(2);
//Much less memory now used

Is it possible to do the same thing somehow with Arrays?

Note that I don't intend to force GC explicitly - this is just to illustrate that when GC does eventually occur, the memory is freed.

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No. You can "shrink" it by your self stackoverflow.com/questions/12231569/… –  Marko Juvančič Jan 3 '14 at 11:03
    
Well VB.NET does have ReDim Preserve, but I'm not at a computer to use Reflector to confirm how it's done. –  Mark Hurd Jan 3 '14 at 11:07
2  
I think you are assuming the setting the capacity is not copying the internal array to a smaller one –  James Barrass Jan 3 '14 at 11:07
    
ReDim creates a new copy of the array - it's just syntactic sugar msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w8k3cys2.aspx –  Spikeh Jan 3 '14 at 11:12
    
@JamesB - yes, you are right. The question becomes kind of irrelevant now. –  Rob Jan 3 '14 at 11:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Simply use TrimExcess of List<T>.

This is the equivalent of list.Capacity = list.Count, which allocates a new array of size list.Count and copies all the elements to it.

You can use the same strategy for arrays, but you'll have to code it yourself though:

int[] arr = new int[50000];

int count = 3;
int[] compact = new int[count];
Array.Copy(arr, compact, count);
arr = null;
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The OP asked about arrays, not Lists. –  Spikeh Jan 3 '14 at 11:07
2  
@Spikeh Well list is mentioned in the title and the code features a List<double>... so I disagree with your comment somewhat. Although this answer does lack a lot of other details. –  Adam Houldsworth Jan 3 '14 at 11:07
    
@AdamHouldsworth "Is it possible to do the same thing somehow with Arrays?". This is a Q&A site, and that's the only question here... –  Spikeh Jan 3 '14 at 11:08
1  
@Spikeh The question is entitled "Can I persuade Garbage Collection to truncate a list? An array?". If anything, it is ambiguous. –  dcastro Jan 3 '14 at 11:08
1  
It is more elegant to write that with Array.Resize(ref arr, count) as in my answer. Of course, it is still allocating a new array and copying the items over. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 3 '14 at 11:45

I'm afraid not. Arrays, by their very nature, are fixed size.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9b9dty7d.aspx

Specifically:

The number of dimensions and the length of each dimension are established when the array instance is created. These values can't be changed during the lifetime of the instance.

You will be able to free up memory by setting array elements to null, though. And of course, you can resize arrays manually, but that requires you to create another array and copy the relevant elements into it.

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Behind the scenes, x.Capacity = 3; or x.TrimExcess() will copy all the entries from the private array that holds them, over to a new tiny array. The huge array will then later be collected.

To do something similar for your own array, you can do:

var y = new double[50000000];
//Lots of memory used here
GC.Collect(2);
//Still lots of memory used

Array.Resize(ref y, 3);

GC.Collect(2);
//Much less memory now used

Doc: Array.Resize<T> method

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@Rob Remember that the List<T> class has a field private T[] _items; which holds an array with the items, and possibly some extra space in the array. If you change Capacity, the old _items instance is abandoned, and a new array is created. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 3 '14 at 11:40

I think this is equivalent to your list example

var x = new Double[50000000];
//Lots of memory used here
GC.Collect(2);
//Still lots of memory used
var y = new Double[3];
Array.Copy(x, 0, y, 0, 3);
x = y;
GC.Collect(2);
//Much less memory now used
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