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I'm trying to print an array in C but failed to. Here is my code:

char str[4];
int j;
void main(void){
    str[4] = 'B','y','e','/0';
    for (j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
    {
        printf("\n", j, str[j] );
    }
}
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Whatever is wrong with void main ( void ) { char str[] = "Bye";}? When declaring a char array, you can use "string" to assign a copy of the string, still... alternatively, if you want to persist in using globals: {'B', 'y', 'e', '\0'}; is how you write an array –  Elias Van Ootegem Jan 3 at 15:18
    
Did you even pass your code through compiler? –  Digital_Reality Jan 3 at 15:24
    
If you only fix the (gross) errors in your printf, your str[4] appears to work, but it does not do what you think: Use of the comma operator. Only str[4] gets a value, which is (a) Out Of Range for this array, and (b) it gets the value 0. Time to restart at page 1 of your study book ... –  Jongware Jan 3 at 15:24
    
Upvoter, care to explain why this is A Good Question..? –  Jongware Jan 3 at 15:26
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6 Answers

1) Your escape character is incorrect. \0 is used to denote the null terminator.

2) Your initialisation is incorrect. Write

 char str[] = {'B','y','e','\0'}; 

instead

3) Your printf is incorrect. Change to

printf("%c", str[j]);
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Actually, printf("\n", j, str[j] ); -> printf("%d %c\n", j, str[j] ); -- the OP forgot to include any formatting. gcc catches this with the -Wall flag: warning: too many arguments for format –  Jongware Jan 3 at 15:18
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You have missed %c in your print.

printf("%c", str[j] );

or

printf("%d %c", j, str[j] );

Also, termination character should be '\0' instead of '/0'

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Going through this line by line:

#include <stdio.h>

Need that line for printf.

char str[4];
int j;
void main(void){

That line should be

int main( void ) {

Unless your compiler documentation explicitly says void is a legal return type for main, main always returns int.

    str[4] = 'B','y','e','/0';

You can't do this; you can initialize the array as part of its declaration, but once declared you cannot use the = operator to assign the array contents. Move the declaration of str to the body of your main function and initialize it like so:

    char str[] = "Bye"; // equivalent to char str[4] = {'B', 'y', 'e', 0};


    for (j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
    {
        printf("\n", j, str[j] );

You need a conversion specifier in the format string to tell printf you're printing an integer and a character:

        printf("%d %c\n", j, str[j] );
    }
}

In summary, your code should read as follows:

#include <stdio.h>

int main( void )
{
  char str[] = "Bye";  // no reason to declare either str or j at file scope,
  int j;               // as they are not used outside of main

  for ( j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
  {
    printf( "%d %c\n", j, str[j] );
  }
}
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Change

str[4] = 'B','y','e','/0';

to

char str[4] = {'B','y','e','\0'};  

or better

char str[] = "Bye";  

and in printf you are not using specifier for j and str[j]. Change

printf("\n", j, str[j] );

to

printf("%d  %c\n", j, str[j] );
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1  
You cannot assign to an array in this manner; this isn't an initialization. –  John Bode Jan 3 at 15:14
    
@JohnBode; Fixed that. –  haccks Jan 3 at 15:16
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you miss the format Specifiers in your printf

change this printf("%d %c\n", j, str[j] );

to printf("\n", j, str[j] );

Format Specifiers

 %i or %d      -          integer 
     %c        -          char 
     %f        -          float 
     %s        -          string

The printf function uses its first argument to determine how many arguments will follow and of what types they are. If you don’t use enough arguments or if they are of the wrong type than printf will get confuses, with as a result wrong answers.

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change

str[4] = 's','e','e','/0';

to

strcpy(str, "see");

and you can change your for loop to a simple one printf

printf("%s\n",str);
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