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i have the following code:

import socket               # Import socket module
import sys

s = socket.socket()         # Create a socket object

host = ''  # Get local machine name
port = 1234                # Reserve a port for your service.

s.connect((host, port))

while 1:
    data = s.recv(1024)
    print ' data ' , data
    d = data.split('?')  # parsing values from server 
    if len(d) < 2: 
         # if does not contain ?, do nothing
         continue
    else: 
         a = d[0]
         b = d[1].replace('\n', '')
         # check how a compares to b, and send response accordingly
         if (a > b):
            s.send('1')
         elif (a == b):
            s.send('2')
         else: 
            s.send('3')

s.close()                     # Close the socket when done

Without the processing code I have, it works fine if I just send a random value. But with the code above, I can only parse the first set of line, and then it stops. (I assume it closes the socket or something?)

The data coming from the socket looks like '1 ? 23' or '23 ? 1' , etc. it expects a response that determines how the two numbers relate.

In comparison, if I have this code:

import socket               # Import socket module
import sys

s = socket.socket()         # Create a socket object

host = ''  # Get local machine name
port = 1234                # Reserve a port for your service.

s.connect((host, port))

backlog = ''

while 1:
    data = s.recv(1024)
    sp = data.split('\n')
    if len(sp) < 2:
        backlog += data
        continue
    line = backlog + sp[0]
    backlog = sp[1]
    data = line
    print ' data ' , data
    if not data:
        break
    s.send ('2')

s.close()                     # Close the socket when done

This code will yield a server response of either 'Correct!' or 'Incorrect...try again!' depending on whether it's right or wrong.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "first set of line"? – Hyperboreus Jan 3 '14 at 20:07
    
First line that gets into the else clause – rcheuk Jan 3 '14 at 20:08

You seem to assume that you always get a full line with each read() call. That is wrong.

You should split your input into lines, and only if you have a full line, you proceed.

backlog = ''
while 1:
    data = s.recv(1024)
    # do we have a line break?
    sp = data.split('\n')
    if len(sp) < 2:
        # no, we haven't...
        backlog += data
        continue
    # yes, we have.
    line = backlog + sp[0] # first part is the now complete line.
    backlog = sp[1] # 2nd part is the start of the new line.
    print ' line ' , line
    d = line.split('?')  # parsing values from server 
    if len(d) < 2: 
         # if does not contain ?, do nothing
         continue
    else: 
         a = int(d[0]) # we want to compare numbers, not strings.
         b = int(d[1])
         # check how a compares to b, and send response accordingly
         if (a > b):
            s.send('1')
         elif (a == b):
            s.send('2')
         else: 
            s.send('3')

Try out what happens now.

Another question which occurs to me is what exactly does the server expect? Really only one byte? Or rather '1\n', '2\n', '3\n'?

share|improve this answer
    
it still hangs. It finishes processing everything and gets to s.send(#), but doesn't read the response from the server. The server only expects one byte. When I hardcode a random value, it returns a reply. I'm not sure if it's timing out or something? – rcheuk Jan 3 '14 at 20:16
    
So the server sends a response to your 1, 2 or 3. How does that look like? And, did you read my last paragraph about the server possibly expecting a complete line with a line ending? – glglgl Jan 3 '14 at 20:19
    
I've modified my post to answer your question. – rcheuk Jan 3 '14 at 20:25
    
@harmlessdragon I am confused now. What does the server expect? 1, 2, 3 or <, >, = or what? In your 2nd example you send a > which seems to get a response out of the server... Maybe you want to describe the protocol as well and/or to show the server's code... – glglgl Jan 3 '14 at 20:29
    
sorry for the confusion. originally it was >, <, =. I changed it to 1, 2, 3 for stackoverflow. i don't think it should matter though as far as how the code processes it. – rcheuk Jan 3 '14 at 20:31

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