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I just spent a bunch of time playing around in IRB (well, PRY actually) trying to figure out how class variables work in Ruby, and I'm completely baffled by what I found.

From what I've seen (correct me if I'm wrong here), class variables are shared among classes, instances of those classes, subclasses, and instances of subclasses. However, for subclasses and their instances, the class variable is only shared to the superclass if the class variable has been assigned to in the superclass. If it hasn't been assigned to in the superclass, then it remains undefined there until it is assigned to at which point the variable becomes shared... What the heck? (See the example below if you're confused.)

So why is this? I heard somewhere that Ruby class variables are based on some similar concept in Smalltalk, but I'm really beside myself as to why this sort of behavior would be desirable.


Example:

In superfoo_and_subbar.rb:

class SuperFoo
  def class_var_x=(x)
    @@x = x
  end
  def class_var_x
    @@x
  end
end

class SubBar < SuperFoo
  # Define these again, just in case they're bound at compile time or something...
  def class_var_x=(x)
    @@x = x
  end
  def class_var_x
    @@x
  end
end

In a PRY (or IRB) session:

# Okay, let's do this!

require './superfoo_and_subbar' # => true

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SuperFoo
SubBar.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SubBar

# Okay, no suprise there, let's define the class variable on SuperFoo
SuperFoo.new.class_var_x = 1
SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # => 1

# Okay, looks about right. What does bar say now?

SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 1

# Okay, that's pretty weird but I did hear that Ruby class variables behave
# that way, so no big deal.

SubBar.new.class_var_x = 2
SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 2
SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # => 2

# Right, so these both point to the same variable then.

New PRY session:

# Now let's try this again:

require './superfoo_and_subbar' # => true

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SuperFoo
SubBar.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SubBar

# So far so good. Let's set x on SubBar first this time

SubBar.new.class_var_x = 2
SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 2

# Okay, so x is now set on SubBar so it should also be set on SuperFoo then, right?

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SuperFoo

# Wait, what? So they're seperate variables now?

SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 2
SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # NameError: uninitialized class variable @@x in SuperFoo

# It certainly looks that way. What happens if I set x on SuperFoo then?

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x = 3

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # => 3
SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 3

# Wait, so now they're the same varaible again? What the heck?

SubBar.new.class_var_x = 4

SuperFoo.new.class_var_x # => 4
SubBar.new.class_var_x # => 4

# ...WHY!?!? Seriously, what's the point of this?
share|improve this question
1  
It behaves like that because of the overwritten methods in SubBar. If it was subclassed like the usual: SubBar < FooBar; end, it would behave like you'd expect. –  steenslag Jan 3 at 21:03
    
@steenslag I wouldn't say 'like I'd expect', because honestly my first instinct would be for class variables to just be syntactic sugar for instance variables on a class. You are correct though that not overriding those two methods makes my second example behave more like the first. –  Ajedi32 Jan 3 at 21:17
    
@Arup I just observed that the surprising behavior does not occur when the overridden methods are removed from the code. (The David A Black example did not surprise me at all! Worrying...) –  steenslag Jan 3 at 21:51

2 Answers 2

That's how inheritance works. Yes class variables are shared to its subclass(s), once super class will define it. SubBar.new.class_var_x created the class variable in the class SubBar only. So it is clear that its super class will not be having any access to it.

class Foo
  def x_class_var=(val)
    @@x =val
  end
  def x_class_var
    @@x
  end
end

class Bar<Foo
  def x_class_var=(val)
    @@x =val
  end
  def x_class_var
    @@x
  end
end

Foo.class_variables # => []
Bar.class_variables # => []
Bar.new.x_class_var = 10
Foo.class_variables # => []
Bar.class_variables # => [:@@x]

Bar.new.x_class_var created the class variable @@x in the Bar class, and Foo being a superclass of Bar will not be having access to this @@x . Now see another way -

Foo.class_variables # => []
Bar.class_variables # => []
Foo.new.x_class_var = 10
Foo.class_variables # => [:@@x]
Bar.class_variables # => [:@@x]

Now @@x is created in Foo class, so being subclass of Foo, Bar has access to @@x. This is because class variables are sharable from super class to subclass, not from subclass to super class, as I shown in the above in example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's a pretty nice mental model of how class variables work. Really though with this question I'm more concerned with 'why' than with 'how'. (E.g. Why does Ruby do it this way? Is there a reason anyone would want to use class variables this way?) Overall though, this is a pretty useful answer. :+1: –  Ajedi32 Jan 3 at 21:00

In the first PRY session, when you checked SubBar.new.class_var_x it checked if @@class_var_x exists. Since it does exists in SuperFoo, and SubBar < SuperFoo, it took SuperFoo's @@class_var_x.

In the second session, when you checked SuperFoo.new.class_var_x, it didn't look at SubBar's @@class_var_x, because objects of parent classes don't care about classes that inherit from them, so it created a new instance of @@class_var_x.

share|improve this answer
    
But then I assigned to SuperFoo.new.class_var_x, and suddenly SubBar.new.class_var_x is referencing the value from SuperFoo instead of the value I assigned to it previously? –  Ajedi32 Jan 3 at 20:48

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