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Is there some restriction on using let! inside match statements? I'm not sure why this won't compile.

module Foo =
  let Bar =
    async {      
      let result =
        match 1 with
        | 1 ->
          let! num = async.Return 12345 // Doesn't compile
          1
        | _ -> 2

      return result
    }

Compilation fails with "This construct may only be used within computation expressions"

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As already explained, the problem is that asynchronous workflows only allow certain kinds of nestings - you cannot use let! inside an ordinary expression, but only inside computation expression. The problem in your example is not really the match but the let (which contains match). To better see what's going on, the specification looks (roughly) as follows:

cexpr := let! x = expr in cexpr
           |  let x = expr in cexpr
           |  return! expr
           |  (...)

The key thing is that the argument is just an ordinary expression expr and the body following let or let! is another computation expression that can contain more asynchronous operations.

So, if you have let x = e1 in e2 then you can only have let! in e2 but not in e1.

In practice, you can do what Daniel suggests and use nested asynchronous workflow, or you can rewrite your code so that the code that needs to be asynchronous does not use waiting inside expressions where this is not possible - it is hard to say how to do this in general, but in your specific example, you can just write:

let bar = async {      
  match 1 with
  | 1 ->
      let! num = async.Return 12345 
      return 1
  | _ -> 
      return 2 }
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Calls to Bind (via let!) must appear at the top level of the computation expression. You can fix it by creating a nested async { } block:

module Foo =
  let Bar =
    async {      
      let result = async {
        match 1 with
        | 1 ->
          let! num = async.Return 12345
          return 1
        | _ -> return 2
      }
      return result
    }
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Shouldn't that be let! result or return! result? –  ildjarn Jan 4 at 3:16
    
Probably. I was just showing the OP the minimal changes required to make it compile. I don't necessarily think it's idiomatic. –  Daniel Jan 4 at 3:28
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This is tricky, because async in F# is only sort-of like async in c#. In F#, it is not a keyword, it is an instance of a Computation Expression. The bang(!) operators[let!;do!;etc!] only work in blocks of computation expressions. That is, they only work for code immediately under the curly braces. When you do a match, as you have done, you have effectively created an anonymous method which does not know anything about the computation expression.

Like c#'s await keyword, the let! operator separates code before the operator from code after the operator into separate methods. I suspect that code before the let! operator has to be able to completely unwind from the stack and that is your problem here. The "let result =" expression needs to be able to be resolved and cannot if we have a "let!" in the middle of it.

I hope that this helps.

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