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We are logging any exceptions that happen in our system by writing the Exception.Message to a file. However, they are written in the culture of the client. And Turkish errors don't mean a lot to me.

So how can we log any error messages in English without changing the users culture?

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4  
Interesting question :) –  leppie Oct 16 '08 at 15:52
3  
Why can't you swith like this: CultureInfo oldCulture = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture; Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en"); // throw new Exception here => Culture is in english Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = oldCulture; –  CheGueVerra Oct 16 '08 at 16:23
2  
Good question... something I've never thought about before. –  Ian Apr 19 '10 at 9:07
3  
I know no developer, that is happy for non-english exception messages :S.. –  Zéiksz Apr 30 '13 at 8:10

13 Answers 13

up vote 30 down vote accepted

This issue can be partially worked around. The Framework exception code loads the error messages from its resources, based on the current thread locale. In the case of some exceptions, this happens at the time the Message property is accessed.

For those exceptions, you can obtain the full US English version of the message by briefly switching the thread locale to en-US while logging it (saving the original user locale beforehand and restoring it immediately afterwards).

Doing this on a separate thread is even better: this ensures there won't be any side effects. For example:

try
{
  System.IO.StreamReader sr=new System.IO.StreamReader(@"c:\does-not-exist");
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
  Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString()); //Will display localized message
  ExceptionLogger el = new ExceptionLogger(ex);
  System.Threading.Thread t = new System.Threading.Thread(el.DoLog);
  t.CurrentUICulture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-US");
  t.Start();
}

Where the ExceptionLogger class looks something like:

class ExceptionLogger
{
  Exception _ex;

  public ExceptionLogger(Exception ex)
  {
    _ex = ex;
  }

  public void DoLog()
  {
    Console.WriteLine(_ex.ToString()); //Will display en-US message
  }
}

However, as Joe correctly points out in a comment on an earlier revision of this reply, some messages are already (partially) loaded from the language resources at the time the exception is thrown.

This applies to the 'parameter cannot be null' part of the message generated when an ArgumentNullException("foo") exception is thrown, for example. In those cases, the message will still appear (partially) localized, even when using the above code.

Other than by using impractical hacks, such as running all your non-UI code on a thread with en-US locale to begin with, there doesn't seem to be much you can do about that: the .NET Framework exception code has no facilities for overriding the error message locale.

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5  
Your example works for a FileNotFoundException, because the message resource is retrieved when the Message property is accessed, not when the exception is thrown. But this is not true for all exceptions (e.g. try throw new ArgumentNullException("paramName")) –  Joe Oct 16 '08 at 20:03
1  
I am confused. I've tried following your answer and to test it I wanted my exception in french, so I did t.CurrentUICulture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("fr-FR"); and t.CurrentCulture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("fr-FR"); yet, the resulting exception was in English... –  VitalyB Oct 23 '11 at 22:10
    
Also not working for invalid host name exception from socket. –  piedpiper Jul 12 '13 at 8:24
1  
@VitalyB The localized exception texts are part of the .NET framework language packs. So if you don't have the French language pack installed, you will not get the translated texts. –  Daniel Rose Apr 28 at 12:23
    
At least with .NET 4.5 all exceptions are instantiated with Environment.GetResourceString("...") so your solution does not work anymore. Best thing is to throw custom exception with your own (english) message text and use InnerException property to keep the old one. –  webber2k6 May 15 at 11:26

You can search for the original exception message at unlocalize.com

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I would imagine one of these approaches:

1) The exceptions are only ever read by you, i.e. they are not a client feature, so you can use hardwired non localised strings that won't change when you run in turkish mode.

2) Include an error code eg. 0X00000001 with each error so that you can easily look it in up in an english table.

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Along these lines, I still am not comfortable with the design of errors in .net. It's exception classes and events, with text descriptions. You discover the error based on the exception class thrown, and the text description of the error. There are usually no numeric error codes (unless they are buried within an inner system exception) that you can look up in a well defined list of errors. Why wouldn't that be simpler?

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Windows needs to have the UI language you want to use installed. It it doesn't, it has no way of magically knowing what the translated message is.

In an en-US windows 7 ultimate, with pt-PT installed, the following code:

Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("pt-PT");
string msg1 = new DirectoryNotFoundException().Message;

Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US");
string msg2 = new FileNotFoundException().Message;

Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("fr-FR");
string msg3 = new FileNotFoundException().Message;

Produces messages in pt-PT, en-US and en-US. Since there is no French culture files installed, it defaults to the windows default (installed?) language.

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That's solved the problem. Polish UI in my situation, installed en MUI language packages ~260MB, using Vistalizator program. –  qlf00n Apr 4 '11 at 14:41

A contentious point perhaps, but instead of setting the culture to en-US, you can set it to Invariant. In the Invariant culture, the error messages are in English.

Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;

It has the advantage of not looking biased, especially for non-American English speaking locales. (a.k.a. avoids snide remarks from colleagues)

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CultureInfo oldCI = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture;

Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture ("en-US");
Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture=new CultureInfo("en-US");
try
{
  System.IO.StreamReader sr=new System.IO.StreamReader(@"c:\does-not-exist");
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
  Console.WriteLine(ex.ToString())
}
Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = oldCI;
Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = oldCI;

Without WORKAROUNDS.

Tks :)

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This appears to be the same workaround as mdb? –  Martin Feb 1 '10 at 14:56
5  
This IS a workaround -_- –  MrCC May 15 '13 at 11:23

Apparently, attempting to change the thread culture will only get you so far. I've been trying to debug an issue on a Russian version of Windows, and cannot get any .Net exceptions to appear in English.

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Solution 1: www.google.com/translate Solution 2: translation.paralink.com –  Quandary Mar 24 '11 at 8:26

I know this is an old topic, but I think my solution may be quite relevant to anyone who stumbles across it in a web search:

In the exception logger you could log ex.GetType.ToString, which would save the name of the exception class. I would expect that the name of a class ought to be independent of language and would therefore always be represented in English (e.g. "System.FileNotFoundException"), though at present I don't have access to a foreign language system to test out the idea.

If you really want the error message text as well you could create a dictionary of all possible exception class names and their equivalent messages in whatever language you prefer, but for English I think the class name is perfectly adequate.

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Setting Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture will be used to localize the exceptions. If you need two kinds of exceptions (one for the user, one for you) you can use following function to translate the exception-message. It's searching in the .NET-Libraries resources for the orignal text to get the resource-key and then returns the translated value. But there one weakness I didn't find a good solution yet: Messages, that contains {0} in resources will not be found. If anyone have a good solution I would be grateful.

public static string TranslateExceptionMessage(Exception E, CultureInfo targetCulture)
{
    try
    {
        Assembly a = E.GetType().Assembly;
        ResourceManager rm = new ResourceManager(a.GetName().Name, a);
        ResourceSet rsOriginal = rm.GetResourceSet(Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture, true, true);
        ResourceSet rsTranslatet = rm.GetResourceSet(targetCulture, true, true);
        foreach (DictionaryEntry item in rsOriginal)
            if (item.Value.ToString() == E.Message.ToString())
                return rsTranslatet.GetString(item.Key.ToString(), false); // success

    }
    catch { }
    return E.Message; // failed (error or cause it's not intelligent enough to locate '{0}'-patterns
}
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You should log the call stack instead of just error message (IIRC, simple exception.ToString() should do that for you). From there, you can determine exactly where the exception originated from, and usually deduce which exception it is.

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We're logging the message and stacktrace. But it's a lot easier if the message is clear. –  Carra May 28 '10 at 12:11

Override exception message in catch block using extension method, Check thrown message is from code or not as mentioned below.

    public static string GetEnglishMessageAndStackTrace(this Exception ex)
    {
        CultureInfo currentCulture = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture;
        try
        {

            dynamic exceptionInstanceLocal = System.Activator.CreateInstance(ex.GetType());
            string str;
            Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = new CultureInfo("en-US");

            if (ex.Message == exceptionInstanceLocal.Message)
            {
                dynamic exceptionInstanceENG = System.Activator.CreateInstance(ex.GetType());

                str = exceptionInstanceENG.ToString() + ex.StackTrace;

            }
            else
            {
                str = ex.ToString();
            }
            Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = currentCulture;

            return str;

        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = currentCulture;

            return ex.ToString();
        }
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The .NET framework comes in two parts:

  1. The .NET framework itself
  2. The .NET framework language packs

All texts (ex. exception messages, button labels on a MessageBox, etc.) are in English in the .NET framework itself. The language packs have the localized texts.

Depending on your exact situation, a solution would be to uninstall the language packs (i.e. tell the client to do so). In that case, the exception texts will be in English. Note however, that all other framework-supplied text will be English as well (ex. the button labels on a MessageBox, keyboard shortcuts for ApplicationCommands).

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