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I want to do something like this :

myYear = record.GetValueOrNull<int?>("myYear"),

Notice the nullable type as the generic parameter.

Since the GetValueOrNull function could return null my first attempt was this :

public static T GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
  where T : class
{
    object columnValue = reader[columnName];

    if (!(columnValue is DBNull))
    {
        return (T)columnValue;
    }
    return null;
}

But the error I get now is

The type 'int?' must be a reference type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method

Right! Nullable is a struct! So I tried changing the class constraint to a struct constraint (and as a side effect can't return null anymore):

public static T GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
  where T : struct

Now the assignment

myYear = record.GetValueOrNull<int?>("myYear");

Gives the following error

The type 'int?' must be a non-nullable value type in order to use it as parameter 'T' in the generic type or method

Is specifying a nullable type as a generic parameter at all possible?

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Pls pls make your signature IDataRecord from DbDataRecord.. –  nawfal Feb 7 '13 at 5:56
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7 Answers 7

up vote 115 down vote accepted

Change the return type to Nullable, and call the method with the non nullable parameter

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int? i = GetValueOrNull<int>(null, string.Empty);
}


public static Nullable<T> GetValueOrNull<T>(DbDataRecord reader, string columnName) where T : struct
{
    object columnValue = reader[columnName];

    if (!(columnValue is DBNull))
    	return (T)columnValue;

    return null;
}
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My first answer was a bit too off-the-cuff here. I was just retyping my answer and this one appeared, nearly verbatim what i was going to say. –  David Alpert Oct 16 '08 at 16:10
1  
I suggest you use "columnValue == DBNull.Value" instead of the 'is' operator, because its slightly faster =) –  driAn Mar 26 '09 at 21:33
16  
Personal preference, but you can use the short form T? instead of Nullable<T> –  Dunc Sep 9 '10 at 15:04
    
This is fine for value types, but then I think it won't work at all with reference types (e.g. GetValueOrNull<string>) because C# doesn't seem to like Nullable<(ref type)> like "string?". Robert C Barth & James Jones's solutions, below, seem much better to me if that's your need. –  bacar Jul 28 '11 at 10:43
    
@bacar - right, hence the "where T : struct", if you want reference types you can create a similar method with "where T: class" –  Greg Dean Aug 15 '11 at 23:30
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A few years late to this one but I think this is the best solution:

public static T GetNullableValue<T>(this SqlDataReader rdr, int index)
{
    object val = rdr[index];

    if (!(val is DBNull))
        return (T)val;

    return default(T);
}

Just use it like this:

decimal? Quantity = rdr.GetNullableValue<decimal?>(1);
string Unit = rdr.GetNullableValue<string>(2);
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2  
+1 for the example showing that it works with both a nullable value type and a reference type. –  bacar Jul 28 '11 at 10:44
2  
This could be shortened to: return rdr.IsDBNull(index) ? default(T) : (T)rdr[index]; –  Foole Nov 9 '11 at 4:33
    
KISS answer saved me some extra code, thanks. –  Cohen Nov 27 '12 at 13:43
    
I think this question explicitly wants null, not default(T). –  mafu Feb 16 at 18:24
    
@mafu default(T) will return null for reference types, and 0 for numerical types, making the solution more flexible. –  James Jones Mar 15 at 19:52
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Just do two things to your original code. Remove the where constraint, and change the last return from return null to return default(T). This way you can return whatever type you want.

By the way, you can avoid the use of "is" by changing your if statement to if (columnValue != DBNull.Value).

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This solution does not work, as there is a logical difference between NULL and 0 –  Greg Dean Oct 17 '08 at 11:53
7  
It works if the type he passes is int?. It will return NULL, just like he wants. If he passes int as the type, it will return 0 since an int can't be NULL. Besides the fact that I tried it and it works perfectly. –  Robert C. Barth Oct 23 '08 at 0:20
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Just had to do something incredible similar to this. My code:

public T IsNull<T>(this object value, T nullAlterative)
{
    if(value != DBNull.Value)
    {
        Type type = typeof(T);
        if (type.IsGenericType && 
            type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>).GetGenericTypeDefinition())
        {
            type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
        }

        return (T)(type.IsEnum ? Enum.ToObject(type, Convert.ToInt32(value)) :
            Convert.ChangeType(value, type));
    }
    else 
        return nullAlternative;
}
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Disclaimer: This answer works, but is intended for educational purposes only. :) James Jones' solution is probably the best here and certainly the one I'd go with.

C# 4.0's dynamic keyword makes this even easier, if less safe:

public static dynamic GetNullableValue(this IDataRecord record, string columnName)
{
  var val = reader[columnName];

  return (val == DBNull.Value ? null : val);
}

Now you don't need the explicit type hinting on the RHS:

int? value = myDataReader.GetNullableValue("MyColumnName");

In fact, you don't even need it at all!

var value = myDataReader.GetNullableValue("MyColumnName");

value will now be an int, or a string, or whatever type was returned from the DB.

The only problem is that this does not prevent you from using non-nullable types on the LHS, in which case you'll get a rather nasty runtime exception like:

Microsoft.CSharp.RuntimeBinder.RuntimeBinderException: Cannot convert null to 'int' because it is a non-nullable value type

As with all code that uses dynamic: caveat coder.

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I think you want to handle Reference types and struct types. I use it to convert XML Element strings to a more typed type. You can remove the nullAlternative with reflection. The formatprovider is to handle the culture dependent '.' or ',' separator in e.g. decimals or ints and doubles. This may work:

public T GetValueOrNull<T>(string strElementNameToSearchFor, IFormatProvider provider = null ) 
    {
        IFormatProvider theProvider = provider == null ? Provider : provider;
        XElement elm = GetUniqueXElement(strElementNameToSearchFor);

        if (elm == null)
        {
            object o =  Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
            return (T)o; 
        }
        else
        {
            try
            {
                Type type = typeof(T);
                if (type.IsGenericType &&
                type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>).GetGenericTypeDefinition())
                {
                    type = Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(type);
                }
                return (T)Convert.ChangeType(elm.Value, type, theProvider); 
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                object o = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T));
                return (T)o; 
            }
        }
    }

You can use it like this:

iRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<int?>("top_overrun_length");
Assert.AreEqual(100, iRes);



decimal? dRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<decimal?>("top_overrun_bend_degrees");
Assert.AreEqual(new Decimal(10.1), dRes);

String strRes = helper.GetValueOrNull<String>("top_overrun_bend_degrees");
Assert.AreEqual("10.1", strRes);
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This may be a dead thread, but I tend to use the following:

public static T? GetValueOrNull<T>(this DbDataRecord reader, string columnName)
where T : struct 
{
    return reader[columnName] as T?;
}
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