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Hello again wonderful stackoverflow community! Last time I asked a question, it was resolved quickly, right off the back and I hope this will go the same way. :)

So I'm toying with winsock, and I want to be able to connect multiple clients to my server simultaneously. I feel that this could be achieved with a loop on thread creation, socket creation, binding, and listening every time a client connects, but my efforts to do so have only turned up with "listen failed with error"'s. Two different ones depending on what I had tried. I googled it only to find the advanced MSDN samples the easiest, and still way too hard, examples out there. Anyone have any simple suggestions? (Side question: I can't seem to get "mrecv()" to return the whole "recvbuf" variable. All I get is one letter. I know this is a newbie mistake I'm making, but I just can't figure it out. :/ This problem can wait until later, however.)

(Here's the server code so far:)

#undef UNICODE

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN

#include <windows.h>
#include <winsock2.h>
#include <ws2tcpip.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>

// Need to link with Ws2_32.lib
#pragma comment (lib, "Ws2_32.lib")
// #pragma comment (lib, "Mswsock.lib")

int minitialize();
int msend(char msendbuf[512]);
char mrecv();
int mshutdown();

#define DEFAULT_BUFLEN 512
#define DEFAULT_PORT "10150"
 WSADATA wsaData;
 int iResult;

 SOCKET ListenSocket = INVALID_SOCKET;
 SOCKET ClientSocket = INVALID_SOCKET;

 struct addrinfo *result = NULL;
 struct addrinfo hints;

 int iSendResult;
 char recvbuf[DEFAULT_BUFLEN];
 int recvbuflen = DEFAULT_BUFLEN;

int main(void) 
{
    minitialize();
    mrecv();

    char mmessage[512];
    if (strncmp(mmessage,"shutdown",(strlen(mmessage))) == 0) {mshutdown();}
    std::cin.getline(mmessage, 512);
    msend(mmessage);

    // shutdown the connection since we're done
    mshutdown();
    std::cin.ignore();

    return 0;
}

int msend(char msendbuf[512])   // Send a message
{
    int iResult3 = send( ClientSocket, msendbuf, 512, 0 );
    if (iResult3 == SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("send failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(ClientSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    printf("Bytes Sent: %ld\n", iResult);
            std::cout<<"msendbuf: "<<msendbuf<<"\n";
            std::cin.ignore();
}

char mrecv() //Recieve a message
{
    int iResult2 = recv(ClientSocket, recvbuf, 512, 0);
        if (iResult2 > 0) {
            printf("Bytes received: %d\n", iResult2);
        std::cout<<"recvbuf: "<<recvbuf<<"\n";
        }
        else if (iResult2 == 0)
            printf("Connection closing...\n");
        else  {
            printf("recv failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
            closesocket(ClientSocket);
            WSACleanup();
            return 1;
        }
    return *recvbuf;
}

int minitialize()   //initialize the winsock server
{
    // Initialize Winsock
    iResult = WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsaData);
    if (iResult != 0) {
        printf("WSAStartup failed with error: %d\n", iResult);
        return 1;
    }

    ZeroMemory(&hints, sizeof(hints));
    hints.ai_family = AF_INET;
    hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;
    hints.ai_protocol = IPPROTO_TCP;
    hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE;

    // Resolve the server address and port
    iResult = getaddrinfo(NULL, DEFAULT_PORT, &hints, &result);
    if ( iResult != 0 ) {
        printf("getaddrinfo failed with error: %d\n", iResult);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // Create a SOCKET for connecting to server
    ListenSocket = socket(result->ai_family, result->ai_socktype, result->ai_protocol);
    if (ListenSocket == INVALID_SOCKET) {
        printf("socket failed with error: %ld\n", WSAGetLastError());
        freeaddrinfo(result);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // Setup the TCP listening socket
    iResult = bind( ListenSocket, result->ai_addr, (int)result->ai_addrlen);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("bind failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        freeaddrinfo(result);
        closesocket(ListenSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    freeaddrinfo(result);

    iResult = listen(ListenSocket, SOMAXCONN);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("listen failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(ListenSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // Accept a client socket
    ClientSocket = accept(ListenSocket, NULL, NULL);
    if (ClientSocket == INVALID_SOCKET) {
        printf("accept failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(ListenSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // No longer need server socket
    closesocket(ListenSocket);
}

int mshutdown()     //shutdown the server
{
    iResult = shutdown(ClientSocket, SD_SEND);
    if (iResult == SOCKET_ERROR) {
        printf("shutdown failed with error: %d\n", WSAGetLastError());
        closesocket(ClientSocket);
        WSACleanup();
        return 1;
    }

    // cleanup
    closesocket(ClientSocket);
    WSACleanup();
    return 0;
}

Yes, if you're wondering, I am planning on putting all those global variables in their respective local functions. I just need them there to clear a little clutter for now, and it doesn't seem to be causing any issues.

share|improve this question
    
Another way of handling multiple clients is using select(), then you don't need threads(for this at least) and won't run into racing issues or deadlocks down the line. –  dutt Jan 4 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

mrecv() is defined as

char mrecv().

In the function mrecv(), it returns a string. Because mrecv() by definition should return a char, the first char of recvbuf is returned. The compiler will not complain of return *recvbuf. This is syntactically correct even when the intent is to return a single character.

accept() returns a file descriptor to the client's connection. Upon return of accept(), you may spawn a new process to process the message using this descriptor while the original process goes back to accepting connections. Or you may create a new thread to process the message from this descriptor while the original thread resumes accepting connections. You will need to loop on accept().

Here's a skeletal template you can use for server. You already got everything correctly on minitialize(). In the sample code below, mrecv() accepts a parameter, the file descriptor of the connected client, newconn.

socket()
bind()
listen(mysock, 10);
while(keep listening) {
    newconn = accept(mysock, &peeraddr, &peeraddrlen)
    if(newconn > 0) {
        if(CreateThread(<security attribute>, <stack size>, (void *)&mrecv, (void *)&newconn, <creation flag>, <threadid>))
            perror("Unable to create thread\n");
    }
}
closesocket(mysock)
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid I can't take credit for minitialize(). Or anything here really. All this is is the MSDN sample code, slightly modified, and broken into functions. :P –  Phixle Jan 4 at 19:08
    
Also, I'm on windows here. So pthread will have to be replaced by CreateThread()... But what arguments should I pass it? I'm not entirely sure how to keep the variables (specifically ClientSocket) separate after creating the new thread. Both the parent and child threads (if that's the correct terminology) would be using the same global variables... And I'm not sure I see a way to pass them around to avoid some kind of problem. :/ –  Phixle Jan 5 at 4:44
    
For the sake of discussion, let's refer to them as parent and child. The parent will use the ClientSocket to wait for connections. As soon as a new connection is accepted, the parent will fork a function and pass the value of ClientSocket to it, let's call the child variable ClientSocketCopy. The function will then process the message from the ClientSocketCopy. –  alvits Jan 5 at 19:46
    
@user3155753 - If you are not comfortable with fork() or CreateThread(), you can use select() wih non blocking I/O O_NONBLOCK. I personally prefer threading for lightweight connections and forking for heavyweight and unrelated connections. The GNU ssh server uses fork with blocking I/O. Here's a good tutorial that you might find useful. lst.de/~okir/blackhats/node121.html. I also have a working code that you can easily port on Windows. –  alvits Jan 5 at 19:56
    
@user3155753 - I edited and changed pthread_create() to CreateThread(). I hope you find them useful. –  alvits Jan 5 at 20:28

I feel that this could be achieved with a loop on thread creation, socket creation, binding, and listening every time a client connects

No. All you have to to is accept the client connection and start a thread with that socket. Leave the listening socket strictly alone. It isn't affected by the accept() operation and there is no need to rebuild it in any way.

share|improve this answer
    
I wish there was a "helpful solution" button. The one marked as correct gave code and insight, but yours was still a very clear explanation of the statement. :) –  Phixle Jan 7 at 3:59

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