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This question is half programming but also half mathematics. I want to interpolate a set of points by a curve without adding unnecessary extremums staying "close to the linear interpolation" while keeping a curve that looks smooth.I know this formulation is vague, but I hope it will begin clearer with an example. Lets's look at the following piece of code and the result:

#! /usr/bin/python

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
ax.spines['left'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['right'].set_color('none')
ax.spines['bottom'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['top'].set_color('none')
ax.xaxis.set_ticks_position('bottom')
ax.yaxis.set_ticks_position('left')

list_points=[(-3,0.1),(-2,0.15),(0,4),(2,-6),(4,-2),(7,-0.15),(8,-0.1)]
(xp,yp)=zip(*list_points)
fun=interp1d(xp,yp,kind='cubic')

xc=np.linspace(min(xp),max(xp),300)

plt.plot(xp,yp,'o',color='black',ms=5)
plt.plot(xc,fun(xc))
fun2=interp1d(xp,yp,kind='linear')
plt.plot(xc,fun2(xc))

plt.show()

Interpolation

I would have expected an interpolant that have only two extremums (around x~0 and x~2) while here we have 5 extremums. It is what most people will draw if we ask them to join the points with a smooth curve by hand. Is there a way to achieve this aim (in python).

Update: Note that xfig has something close (called "approximate spline drawing") with the inconveniences that the curve does not pass exactly by the specified points. I would prefer a curve that passes exactly through the specified points but I would welcome the xfig method if no one knows a better solution.

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Hmmm out of curiosity. It its not a fitter, why does the function need to be smooth? With interpolation you will always get a finite set of points. So you never can tell for sure if the original was smooth or not. –  luk32 Jan 4 at 9:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While not exactly the same(?), your question is similar to this one, so perhaps the same answer would be useful. You can try a monotonic interpolator. The PchipInterpolator class (which you can refer to by its shorter alias pchip) in scipy.interpolate can be used. Here's a version of your script with a curve created using pchip included:

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d, pchip
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
ax.spines['left'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['right'].set_color('none')
ax.spines['bottom'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['top'].set_color('none')
ax.xaxis.set_ticks_position('bottom')
ax.yaxis.set_ticks_position('left')

list_points = [(-3,0.1),(-2,0.15),(0,4),(2,-6),(4,-2),(7,-0.15),(8,-0.1)]
(xp,yp) = zip(*list_points)
fun = interp1d(xp,yp,kind='cubic')

xc = np.linspace(min(xp),max(xp),300)

plt.plot(xp,yp,'o',color='black',ms=5)
plt.plot(xc,fun(xc))
fun2 = interp1d(xp,yp,kind='linear')
plt.plot(xc,fun2(xc))

p = pchip(xp, yp)
plt.plot(xc, p(xc), 'r', linewidth=3, alpha=0.6)

plt.show()

Here's the plot it generates:

plot

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Have you tried a quadratic spline instead - though I am not convinced that will help. Another fudge option is to add additional data-points very close to your maximums. e.g. at (-0.05,4) and (1.95, -6) - this would cause the cubic spline algorithm to flatten those areas near the maximum. Depends what you are trying to achieve. There are techniques to constrain maximum and minimum of cubic splines but I am not familiar enough with those or python / matplotlib to help, sorry!

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This is kinda heuristic blind walking =) (or random-walk if one prefers). I don't think any poly-nominal only approach will work. –  luk32 Jan 4 at 9:39
    
No, quadratic splines is still worse. @luk32 I am not convinced either that a polynomial only interpolation will help. In fact I have no idea what mathematics it will need to use. I wonder if someone have coded such a thing (with any method) (note xfig has something close: see the updated question). –  Olivier Jan 4 at 9:49

You can use the linear interpolation and then filter it (with a mean filter) :

size = 51.0;    
fun = interpolate.interp1d(xp, yp,kind='linear');
filt = (1/size)*np.ones(size);
yc = signal.convolve( fun(xc),filt,'same');

With the parameter sizeyou can control the smoothing degree.

enter image description here

This is the integrated code:

import numpy as np
from scipy.interpolate import interp1d
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy import interpolate,signal

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(1,1,1)
ax.spines['left'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['right'].set_color('none')
ax.spines['bottom'].set_position('zero')
ax.spines['top'].set_color('none')
ax.xaxis.set_ticks_position('bottom')
ax.yaxis.set_ticks_position('left')

list_points=[(-3,0.1),(-2,0.15),(0,4),(2,-6),(4,-2),(7,-0.15),(8,-0.1)]
(xp,yp)=zip(*list_points)
xc=np.linspace(min(xp),max(xp),300)

########################################################
size = 41.0;#Put here any odd number
fun = interpolate.interp1d(xp, yp,kind='linear');
filt = (1/size)*np.ones(size);
yc = signal.convolve(fun(xc),filt,'same');
########################################################

plt.plot(xp,yp,'o',color='black',ms=5)
plt.plot(xc,yc)
plt.plot(xc,fun(xc))
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
The curve does not pass exactly through the specified points but that nevertheless gives a good result. –  Olivier Jan 4 at 10:08

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