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In gedit, I wrote :

#include<stdio.h>

void main(void)
{
char s[100];
char c;
printf("Enter a string :\n");
scanf("%s", s);
printf("Enter a character you don't want in the above string :\t");
scanf("%c", &c);
printf("%c", c);

printf("Your new string is :\n");
printf("%s\n", s);
}

The output I got in ubuntu terminal : Enter a string :
abcd
Enter a character you don't want in the above string :
Your new string is :
abcd

i.e., it waited for first scanf input, but completely ignored the second scanf and printf immediately after it (or may be not, because after "Enter a character you don't want in the above string :
", there is a nextline as you can see). The lines were not commented mistakenly, otherwise gedit would change it's color. Never saw anything like it before, completely puzzled......

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marked as duplicate by Michael Burr, Joseph Quinsey, manuell, Roman C, Tim Dean Jan 4 at 19:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

Nothing was ignored. But the second scanf read \n character that was left in the input buffer after reading abcd. That's why it didn't wait for another character from user.

You might want to read the string with fgets instead of scanf:

fgets(s, 100, stdin);

Also note that scanf("%s" will read up to whitespace, not the whole string.

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Thank you. The same will happen with getchar() too. That means I'll have to use one extra scanf between too consecutive ones ? –  user246812 Jan 4 at 10:42
    
You can make the second scanf to skip all spaces (and new-lines) before it reads the character: scanf(" %c", &c); (note the space before %c). Or you can skip everything until the end of line calling getchar in a loop. It depends on which input do you want. –  Inspired Jan 4 at 10:49

As mentioned already - scanf("%s", s); is not consuming \n that is left in the buffer. You don't have to type \n actually, just press Ctrl+D after writing a string. It will send EOT character which tells console to pass input to program.

Solution

Easiest way is to add space in scanf as follows:

scanf(" %c", &c);

From scanf documentation:

White space (such as blanks, tabs, or newlines) in the format string match any amount of >white space, including none, in the input.

fflush

You should NOT use fflush(stdin); since it is documented as working on output streams, not on input ones.

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Use getchar() to deal with the \n in the input.

So getchar() will take \n as input and scanf() will take your input. Check out below

#include<stdio.h>

void main(void)
{
    char s[100];
    char c;
    printf("Enter a string :\n");
    scanf("%s", s);
    printf("Enter a character you don't want in the above string :\t");

    char d = getchar();      //Takes the extra newline (\n) character as input

    scanf("%c", &c);
    printf("%c", c);

    printf("Your new string is :\n");
    printf("%s\n", s);
}
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A difficultly with this approach occurs with input like "abc def". s will first have the value "abc", d will take on the value of ' ' and then s will have then value "def". –  chux Jan 6 at 3:28

Add

fflush(stdin);

After

scanf("%s", s);

Inspired already explained why you need to do that.

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1  
That is undefined behaviour –  AJ. Jan 4 at 10:40
1  
    
Thanks AJ. now it's clear. –  user3014282 Jan 4 at 10:50

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