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Does anyone know how the closures work in a Mocha + Chai test? I'm not sure if the test runner, in this case phantom-js, is messing things up but it just doesn't make any sense. It would appear that vars created in each it function block clash with each other.

Basically a game can only have 10 players, but in every tests the game var already has 10 players in it. Very confusing.

"use strict";

CardsAgainstHumanity.module("Game", function(Game, CardsAgainstHumanity, Backbone, Marionette, $, _){
    Game.Game = Backbone.Model.extend({
        maxPlayers: 10,
        defaults: {
            players: new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.PlayerCollection()
        },
        addPlayer: function(player){
            if(this.get("players").size() < this.maxPlayers){
                this.get("players").add(player);
            }
            else{
                throw(Error("This game is currently full"));
            }
        },
        removePlayer: function(player){
            this.get("players").remove(player);
        }
    });
});

describe.only("players can be added and removed", function(){
    it("should add a player if there is space", function(){
        var game = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Game.Game();
        var player = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.Player({
            id: 1
        });
        game.addPlayer(player);
        game.get("players").contains(player).should.be.true;
    });
    it("should not add a player if the game is full", function(){
        var game = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Game.Game();
        _.times(game.maxPlayers, function(index){
            var game = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Game.Game();
            game.addPlayer(new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.Player({
               id: index
            }));
        });
        (function(){
            game.addPlayer(new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.Player({
                id: game.maxPlayers
             }));
        }).should.throw(Error("This game is currently full"));
    });
    it("should remove said player if said player is found", function(){
        var game = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Game.Game();
        var player = new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.Player({
            id: 1
        });
        game.addPlayer(player);
        game.get("players").contains(player).should.be.true;
        game.removePlayer(player);
        game.get("players").contains(player).should.be.false;
    });
share|improve this question
    
From what evidence are you inferring that game has 10 players in every one of your tests? – Louis Jan 4 '14 at 19:19
    
In every test case the game throws an exception when any player is added. I ran it in a real browser and the game var had 10 players on the first test. – James Pace Jan 4 '14 at 20:46
    
What exception? – Louis Jan 4 '14 at 20:49
    
A custom error to say the game is full. Which gets thrown when you try to add the 11th player. – James Pace Jan 5 '14 at 10:51
    
I've added the game class so you can see what it does. It hardly does anything at the moment. I was trying to write it TDD style but it hasn't gone very well! – James Pace Jan 5 '14 at 11:23
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The red flag I see is this:

defaults: {
    players: new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.PlayerCollection()
}

A Backbone model's defaults are attached to the model's prototype and are shallow copied to each instance's attributes. With a defaults like that, each instance of the model you create will end up sharing exactly the same PlayerCollection. That could explain why your players is always ending up full when you don't expect it to be.

The usual solution to this sort of thing is to use a function for defaults:

defaults: function() {
    return {
        players: new CardsAgainstHumanity.Player.PlayerCollection()
    };
}

That way each instance will get its own unique defaults object and thus its own unique PlayerCollection in its players attribute. Generally you should use a function for your defaults any time it contains a mutable value (i.e. anything other than numbers, strings, and booleans).

If my guess is right then you have a win for your test suite as it has uncovered a hidden and tricky bug.

share|improve this answer
    
exactly correct. good call @mu – Jed Schneider Jan 6 '14 at 21:03
    
Oohh well spotted! I never thought about that. I'll try when I get home! – James Pace Jan 7 '14 at 17:19

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