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I'm currently figuring my way around a bash script (sorry, can't use other languages like perl) to keep track of a running log during a server startup. Basically, I have to trigger certain events depending on whether or not i run into certain strings or patterns while the log is being written. Currently, i have this code:

LOG=path_to_logfile
LINE1="[1-9][0-9]* some string"
LINE2="another string"
LINE3="third string"

tail -fn0 $LOG | \
while read line
do
 echo $line | grep "$LINE1" || echo $line | grep "$LINE2" || echo $line | grep "$LINE3"

 if [ $? = 0 ]
 then
      TMP=<echo line above>

      ... bunch of conditional statements...
 fi
done

However, this is kinda slow; by the time the line i need to track is detected by the echo/grep combinations using or, it's waaaay after the server already started up. What's a good alternative to the above? I've read awk should be used but when i tried writing it in awk, either i wrote it wrong or the processing was also taking too much time to finish.

Any help will be appreciated. Thanks!

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What are you tailing? Which server log? –  Zlatko Jan 4 at 16:03
    
I'm starting up a jboss server, which let's just say has /path/to/server.log as the log file. Sorry, just edited the code as I typed this in my mobile so the formatting was whacked out. –  callie16 Jan 4 at 16:06
1  
Unfortunately, as soon as the output of tail -f goes trough a pipe, the stream is buffered and everything after the pipe no longer reflects the real time of log being written. –  mouviciel Jan 4 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rather than calling grep (potentially several times) on each line, let bash do the regular expression matching.

LOG=path_to_logfile
LINE1="[1-9][0-9]* some string"
LINE2="another string"
LINE3="third string"

tail -fn0 $LOG | while read line
do
    if [[ $line =~ $LINE1|$LINE2|$LINE3 ]]; then
        TMP=<echo line above>
         ... bunch of conditional statements...
    fi
done
share|improve this answer

I'd try something like this instead:

tail -fn0 $LOG | egrep "$LINE1|$LINE2|$LINE3" | \
    while read TMP
    do
        ...
    done

That way, the while read loop, which at a guess is going to be the slowest part of this whole operation, is only invoked when egrep actually finds a matching line in the input log.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense, will try this. My problem with the above was everytime I changed the echo/grep part, when I read the variable line, it wasn't updated (i.e. the process detected a match but the log line being read wasn't updated yet with the latest line). Hope that made sense. But I'll go try egrep. Thanks! –  callie16 Jan 4 at 16:11

You can have multiple match statements, which are ORed together to see if the line matches:

tail -f -n0 "$LOG" | grep -e "$LINE1" -e "$LINE2" -e "$LINE3" | while IFS= read -r line
do
    # Do something with each matching $line
done
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