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Is there a standard definition for the size of the __DATE__ and __TIME__ strings in ANSI C?

The motivation behind this question is:

  • I have two applications running on two different CPUs.

  • During runtime, app #1 receives date and time (as part of version-info) from app #2.

  • Of course, app #2 takes them from the preprocessor __DATE__ and __TIME__ definitions.

So I would like to know whether or not I can statically allocate in app #1 an array, into which I can copy the info received from app #2.

Thanks

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1  
You can, as has been noted. I've found the real problem is getting the compilation unit containing the definitions recompiled –  doynax Jan 4 at 17:14
    
I have previously solved this issue using a pre-compilation script which deletes the object file containing the _DATE_ and _TIME_ strings (or alternatively, "touches" the source file that uses them). –  barak manos Jan 4 at 17:19
    
Another way to do it is to have the linker step create the source file that contains the version and date information, and then compile that as it links the executable (or builds the library). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 4 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

__DATE__

The date of translation of the source file (a character string literal of the form "Mmm dd yyyy", where the names of the months are the same as those generated by the asctime function, and the first character of dd is a space character if the value is less than 10). If the date of translation is not available, an implementation-defined valid date shall be supplied.

__TIME__

The time of translation of the source file (a character string literal of the form "hh:mm:ss" as in the time generated by the asctime function). If the time of translation is not available, an implementation-defined valid time shall be supplied.

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So can I count on the _DATE_ string always being 12-character long and the _TIME_ string always being 9-character long (including the 0 character at the end of each string)? –  barak manos Jan 4 at 17:15
1  
@barakmanos: yes. The standard defines that as the correct behaviour. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 4 at 17:31

ISO/IEC 9899:2011, §6.10.8.1 Mandatory macros

__DATE__ The date of translation of the preprocessing translation unit: a character string literal of the form "Mmm dd yyyy", where the names of the months are the same as those generated by the asctime function, and the first character of dd is a space character if the value is less than 10. If the date of translation is not available, an implementation-defined valid date shall be supplied.

__TIME__ The time of translation of the preprocessing translation unit: a character string literal of the form "hh:mm:ss" as in the time generated by the asctime function. If the time of translation is not available, an implementation-defined valid time shall be supplied.

It is very straight-forward, therefore.

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Are ANSI and ISO interchangeable as far as C is concerned or do they refer to different versions if you leave the year off? Is there such a beast as ANSI C11? –  Leushenko Jan 9 at 9:41
    
Yes, the standards are the same. Strictly, the ANSI C89 standard had different section numbers from ISO C90, bu the substantive content was the same. There is an ANSI C11; it is the same as ISO C11. (There is a BSI — British Standards Institute — C11 too; it too is the same as ISO C11. Repeat for each national standards body.) –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 9 at 15:03

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