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I'm trying to increase my understanding of basic library linking, dependencies, etc. I created a Visual Studio solution with three projects

  1. Static lib using /MTd with a single class (Foo), one method int GetNum() { return 5; }

  2. Shared dll using /MDd with a single class (Bar), one method int GetNum() { Foo f; return f.GetNum(); }

  3. Win32 console app. That calls Bar b; std::cout << b.GetNum() << std::endl

When I tried to build this, it complained it couldn't find my dll's associated lib. Did a little research, saw that I needed to add __declspec(dllexport) to my GetNum() method and I'd get a .lib. Cool.

Next hurtle was the console app said it couldn't find the static lib for Foo. I added it to my references and it all build and ran fine.

My question is - why does my exe need to know anything about Foo? I wanted to effectively "bake" in all my dependencies into the dll so I could just share that, link into it, and be good to go.

Is this just not how the language works or a setting / pattern I'm missing? My end goal is to be able to build a dll that encapsulates the usage of third party .lib's and not have the client app need to worry about adding references to all of them.

Update

Here is most of the code.

    // ---------------------- Lib (e.g. Foo)
    #pragma once
    class MathLib
    {
    public:
        MathLib(void);
        ~MathLib(void);
        int GetNum() { return 83; }
    };

    // ---------------------- DLL (e.g. Bar)
    #pragma once

    #ifdef CONSOLETEST_EXPORT
        #define CONSOLETEST_API __declspec(dllexport)
    #else
        #define CONSOLETEST_API __declspec(dllimport)
    #endif

    #include "MathLib.h"

    class MathDll
    {
    public:
        __declspec(dllexport) MathDll(void);
        __declspec(dllexport) ~MathDll(void);
        __declspec(dllexport) int GetNumFromDyn() 
        {
            MathLib m;
            return m.GetNum();
        }

    };


    // ---------------------- exe
    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
        MathDll m;
        std::cout << "num is " << m.GetNumFromDyn() << std::endl;
        return 0;
    }
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Do you have Foo anywhere in headers of DLL which you include into console application? Show you code, otherwise it's hard to say what's going on. –  Haroogan Jan 4 '14 at 19:38
    
I do have an #include "Foo.h" from the Bar.h, how else should I have Foo encapsulated in Bar? I'll update with code. –  Ternary Jan 4 '14 at 20:18
    
See... This is the exact problem. You didn't bake it in. Foo which should rather be an implementation detail used by Bar, in your case is still present in the interface through its explicit inclusion into Bar's header. I'll write answer how to solve this. Hold on. –  Haroogan Jan 4 '14 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With C/C++, it's very important to structure your code properly across headers (e.g. h, hpp, hxx, h++, etc.) and translation units (usually called sources, e.g. c, cpp, cxx, c++, etc.). When you design a library, you should be constantly thinking what belongs to its interface (i.e. supposed to be seen by consumers) and what belongs to its implementation (i.e. not supposed to be seen by consumers).

Remember the rule of thumb - all symbols that are present in any header will be seen by consumers (if included), and, as a result, required by consumers to be resolved during linking stage at some point in time later!

This is essentially what happened to you in your toy example. So let's fix it by using a simple rule, which you should remember by heart: Put as much as possible into translation units, i.e. keep headers minimal. Now let's use your example to show how it works:

MathLib.hpp:

#pragma once

class MathLib {
public:
  MathLib();
  ~MathLib();
  int GetNum();
};

MathLib.cpp:

#include "MathLib.hpp"

MathLib::MathLib() {}

MathLib::~MathLib() {}

int MathLib::GetNum() { return 83; }

Now build MathLib.cpp as static library.

MathDll.hpp:

#pragma once

#ifdef CONSOLETEST_EXPORT
#  define CONSOLETEST_API __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#  define CONSOLETEST_API __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

class CONSOLETEST_API MathDll {
public:
  MathDll();
  ~MathDll();
  int GetNumFromDyn();
};

MathDll.cpp:

#include "MathDll.hpp"
#include "MathLib.hpp"

MathDll::MathDll() {}

MathDll::~MathDll() {}

int MathDll::GetNumFromDyn() { 
  MathLib m;
  return m.GetNum();
}

Now build MathDll.cpp as dynamic-link library (DLL) and don't forget to add definition CONSOLETEST_EXPORT during its build, so that CONSOLETEST_API is __declspec(dllexport), and, as a result, an import library with exported symbols (i.e. the MathDll class and its methods) is generated for the DLL. On MSVC you can achieve this by adding /DCONSOLETEST_API to the invocation of compiler. Finally, when building this DLL, certainly link it with previously built static library, MathLib.lib.

NOTE: It's better to export the whole class like I did above with class CONSOLETEST_API MathDll, rather than export all methods individually.

main.cpp:

#include "MathDll.hpp"

#include <iostream>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[]) {
  MathDll m;
  std::cout << "num is " << m.GetNumFromDyn() << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Now build main.cpp as console application and only link it with previously built import library for DLL, MathDll.lib.

Notice how the problem is gone because I've got rid of transitive dependency to MathLib (through MathDll.hpp) from main.cpp, since now the #include "MathLib.hpp" inclusion is done in the translation unit MathDll.cpp (because it's actually only needed there according to above rule), and is therefore built into binary artifact (DLL in this case) and not present in its interface.

Understanding all of this is really important for proper native software development with C/C++, so it's really good that you ask this question beforehand. I meet people who don't know/understand this quite often, what results in complete nightmare for them (amateurs), and us, when we have to deal with that crappy software they write...

share|improve this answer
    
Concise and well written answer. So can I assume when needing to do more complex things, I would use the pointer to interface pattern to hide the dependency from the consumer? You seem to know a lot on the topic, perhaps you could help me with a larger challenge I'm facing (stackoverflow.com/questions/20913884/…). –  Ternary Jan 4 '14 at 22:49
    
Yes, your assumption is right: sometimes in order to avoid inclusion and use forward declaration instead you would have to employ pointers. Concerning larger challenge, well, once again it lacks important information: some examples, compiler output, etc. –  Haroogan Jan 5 '14 at 13:06
    
Understood, I'll try to work up as concise example to illustrate the issue. –  Ternary Jan 5 '14 at 16:20
    
Are the /MTd vs /MDd options related to why I see a _crtisvalidheappointer when writing a method in a /MTd dll that returns a string to a consuming /MDd dll? –  Ternary Jan 6 '14 at 5:15

Consider the case when MathLib is a part of MathDll class.

//MathDll.h
#include "MathLib.h"
class MathDll
{
private:
   MathLib m;

public:
    __declspec(dllexport) MathDll(void);
    __declspec(dllexport) ~MathDll(void);
    __declspec(dllexport) int GetNumFromDyn() 
    {
        return m.GetNum();
    }

};

you will have to now include MathLib.h into your MathDll.h, which propagates to the console app too.

You can avoid this...

By using PIMPL idiom to encapsulate everything into the DLL. Provide the forward declaration of the class MathLib in the header and the rest of the implemenation hidden in the Dll. You can also consider exporting the whole class.

//------------MathDll.h
class MathLib;

class __declspec(dllexport) MathDll
{
private:
   MathLib* m;

public:
    MathDll(void);
    ~MathDll(void);
    int GetNumFromDyn();
};

//--------------MathDll.cpp
#include "MathLib.h"
#include "MathDll.h"

MathDll::MathDll(void)
{
     m = new MathLib();
}   

MathDll::~MathDll(void)
{
     delete m;
}   

int MathDll::GetNumFromDyn()
{
     return m->GetNum();
}

This example also uses RAII idiom for automatic memory management.

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