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I have a bit of javascript, triggered from an HTML button, that calls a function. This is using Jquery as well, so there are a couple of underlying functions from that that get called in this process, too. In my script I make a couple of changes to window.location in order to communicate to a remote system (which is supposed to fire off different scripts in response to these calls). This window.location definition is not using the HTTP protocol, but FMP, a registered - on my machine anyway - protocol for FileMaker Pro.

Sample code:

function compareJSON() {
    dataSession=({ //build object for output    });   
    $.each( dataSession.chapters , function( indexC, value ) {  
        //compare objects to some others, testing and changing data
    });
    //Call remote script on other system
    window.location= "fmp://blah.dee.com/Blar?script=SaveJSON&$JSONobject=" + JSON.stringify( dataSession );
   //Call remote script on other system
   window.location="fmp://blah.dee.com/Blar?script=EditJSON";
}

(Keep in mind, since this is using Jquery, that simply pressing the button that calls this compareJSON() function creates a stack of 2 or 3 other functions before running my function. But, even if it were being called directly in some manner, the compare function itself would be on the stack and thus window.location wouldn't get evaluated until the end of that function.)

The problem is that it looks like the Window.Location isn't being finalized/set/sent/whatever until the ENTIRE JS call stack is finished. So, when I click the button that starts these function calls the stack gets a few Jquery functions put on it (e.g. 'handler', 'default', 'each loop'...), then it hits the JS code that I wrote, which in turn adds a few more function calls to the stack; and then there are a few more Jquery functions that added to the stack, etc. But these stacked window.location definitions made in my functions don't actually trigger the remote system until I step all the way through the JS call stack and exit everything. So the window.location is only defined/set to be whatever was last set in the function calls, instead of including all the intervening definitions/sets that occurred in the stack. It's like a variable that gets changed multiple times in the call stack but only gets read once at the end.

Is there a way to force window.location to be evaluated when it is set instead of waiting for whatever the last setting was?

Thanks, J

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1  
Can you show your code in question? –  Alex Shilman Jan 4 '14 at 19:18
1  
You can set window.location and then wrap your subsequent code in a very short timeout, but note that setting window.location generally blows away the entire window context. What are you trying to achieve, overall? –  Pointy Jan 4 '14 at 19:27
    
@Alex: added some sample code. –  Cronk Jan 5 '14 at 20:32
1  
Your question is a bit confusing, so I'm not sure if this is relevant, but keep in mind that JS is a single-threaded language. This means functions will not get called until the call stack before them is run. Also, you might want to try an iframe or something instead of window.location –  Zove Games Jan 5 '14 at 20:37
1  
@Cronk ah well my suggestion may not make sense, but as Zove Games said, the JavaScript environment is single-threaded. The browser container is waiting for script execution to complete before it obeys the changes to window.location. The setTimeout idea allows you to continue processing in a subsequent event loop; whether that would work in your case I don't know. –  Pointy Jan 5 '14 at 20:40

2 Answers 2

You may want to use an iframe:

function callScript(url) {
    var ifr = document.createElement('iframe');
    ifr.src = url;
    // you can even add ifr.onload = function() {doSomething();}; if you want
}

This will allow any number of calls at once.

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This might not work, but the timeout idea is to change something like this:

// code code code ...
window.location = newUrl;
// more code ...

into:

// code code code ...
window.location = newUrl;
setTimeout(function() {
  // more code ...
}, 1);

That allows the browser an interval in which it can do something before starting the next event loop for the timer handler.

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