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I am writing a program. And in the main function "int main()" i call to a function called, lets say, "int X()". Inside "int X()" I would like to call to another function "void Y()". Any ideas how to do this? I tried, inside the X() function, doing "Y();" and "void Y();" but to no prevail. Any tips on getting this to work? if at all possible?

ex.

#include<iostream>

int X()
{
   Y();
}

void Y()
{
   std::cout << "Hello";
}

int main()
{
   X();
   system("pause");
   return 0;
}
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You need to define Y before X so X knows about it when it uses it. You also need a "using namespace std;" –  Julian Jan 4 '14 at 19:59
    
You need to read your C++ book again. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 4 '14 at 20:09
4  
No, no, no. No using namespace std;. You suck. Please stop giving advice to people. –  Puppy Jan 4 '14 at 20:13
    
did you try this? got any error? –  Sourav Ghosh Jan 4 '14 at 20:25
    
Thanks! Turns out I just had to put the function Y() above X()! We are using books that came out roughly 15 years ago so it tends to leave out some key info :/ –  TThom246 Jan 4 '14 at 21:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You must define or declare your functions before you use them. For example:

void Y();         //this is just a declaration, you need to implement this later in the code.
int X(){
    //...
    Y();
    //...
    return someIntValue;   //you will get warned if function supposed to return something does not do it.
}

OR

void Y(){
    //code that Y is supposed to do...
}

int X(){
    //...
    Y();
    //...
}

When you call the function you do not write its type anymore (to call functon Y you write: Y(arguments); and not void Y(arguments);). You write the type only when declaring or defining the function.

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Awesome! Good to know, we used to write the "void" or "int" before we called the function alot. –  TThom246 Jan 4 '14 at 21:41
    
That probably caused quite some problems (compiler may refuse to compile such code, as it would consider using name of the funcion preceded by its type many times as multiple definitions of the same function.) If you found this answer helpful you may mark it as accepted. –  3yakuya Jan 4 '14 at 21:45
    
I would love to! But this is my first post and I only have a Rep of 1 so im not allowed :/ –  TThom246 Jan 4 '14 at 21:47
    
Oooh, that makes sense haha. Thanks! –  TThom246 Jan 4 '14 at 22:08

You must declare Y() before using it:

void Y();

int X()
{Y();}
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When the compiler reaches:

int X()
{
   Y();
}

it doesn't know what Y is. You need to declare Y before X by inverting their declarations:

void Y()
{
   std::cout << "Hello";
}

int X()
{
   Y();
}

int main()
{
   X();
   system("pause");
   return 0;
}

You should also provide a return value for X, otherwise a warning will pop up.

And please, don't follow the suggestion of using using namespace std;. The way you writing std::cout is just fine.

And here is the working example.

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Thanks a bunch! Really helped me out! –  TThom246 Jan 4 '14 at 21:39

You need to declare the Y function before the X function uses it.

Write this line before the definition of X:

void Y();
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