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Assume I've got an users table with 1M users on MySQL/InnoDB:

users

  • userId (Primary Key, Int)
  • status (Int)
  • more data

If I would want to have an exact count of the amount of users with status = 1 (denoting an activate account), what would be the way to go for big tables, I was thinking along the lines of:

usercounts

  • status
  • count

And then run an TRIGGER AFTER INSERT on users that updates the appropiate columns in usercounts

Would this be the best way to go?

ps. An extra small question: Since you also need an TRIGGER AFTER UPDATE on users for when status changes, is there a syntax available that:

  • Covers both the TRIGGER AFTER INSERT and TRIGGER AFTER UPDATE on status?
  • Increments the count by one if a count already is present, else inserts a new (status, count = 0) pair?
share|improve this question
    
How often rows are being inserted/updated in users table? What are the valid values for status? Only 0 and 1 or there are others? – peterm Jan 4 '14 at 20:19
    
@peterm It is just a conceptual example, but an example could be status: 1 = ok, 2 = deleted, 3 = banned. And inserts would only happen every once in a while, updates however would happen quite a lot, but not on the status field itself. – skiwi Jan 4 '14 at 20:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Would this be the best way to go?

Best (opinion-based) or not but it's definitely a possible way to go.

is there a syntax available that: covers both the TRIGGER AFTER INSERT and TRIGGER AFTER UPDATE on status?

No. There isn't a compound trigger syntax in MySQL. You'll have to create separate triggers.

is there a syntax available that: increments the count by one if a count already is present, else inserts a new (status, count = 0) pair?

Yes. You can use ON DUPLICATE KEY clause in INSERT statement. Make sure that status is a PK in usercounts table.

Now if users can be deleted even if only for maintenance purposes you also need to cover it with AFTER DELETE trigger.


That being said your triggers might look something like

CREATE TRIGGER tg_ai_users
AFTER INSERT ON users
FOR EACH ROW
  INSERT INTO usercounts (status, cnt)
  VALUES (NEW.status, 1)
  ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE cnt = cnt + 1;

CREATE TRIGGER tg_ad_users
AFTER DELETE ON users
FOR EACH ROW
    UPDATE usercounts 
       SET cnt = cnt - 1
     WHERE status = OLD.status;

DELIMITER $$
CREATE TRIGGER tg_au_users
AFTER UPDATE ON users
FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  IF NOT NEW.status <=> OLD.status THEN -- proceed ONLY if status has been changed
    UPDATE usercounts 
       SET cnt = cnt - 1
     WHERE status = OLD.status;
    INSERT INTO usercounts (status, cnt) VALUES (NEW.status, 1)
    ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE cnt = cnt + 1;
  END IF;
END$$
DELIMITER ;

To initially populate usercounts table use

INSERT INTO usercounts (status, cnt)
SELECT status, COUNT(*)
  FROM users
 GROUP BY status

Here is SQLFiddle demo

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason that on my database (10K users), it sometimes takes 0.03s, but occasionally 4 seconds? Or would the cause be somewhere in the shared webhosting. – skiwi Jan 5 '14 at 12:16
    
Successive results from updating 100 random records: 0.03s, 0.3s, 0.98s, 0.07s, 0.20s, 0.82s, 0.09s. Might be the database? – skiwi Jan 5 '14 at 12:17
    
For future reference you might want to explain what NOT x <=> y does, I just figured it out for myself though – skiwi Jan 5 '14 at 14:14
    
As in any performance related question it's next to impossible to tell something intelligent not seeing and benchmarking the real system. Now it might be a drawback of this approach (lock waits) caused by concurrent processing "fighting" over these three records in usercounts table. Use SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS to check if it's the case. Here is an article on the subject – peterm Jan 6 '14 at 5:08
    
Regarding the null-safe comparison: If one would explain everything in his answer then nothing would be left to catch the reader's attention... :) Great that you figured it out on your own. – peterm Jan 6 '14 at 5:11

I think there are simpler options available to you.

Just add an index to the field you'd like to count on.

ALTER TABLE users ADD KEY (status);

Now a select should be very fast.

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM users WHERE status = 1

share|improve this answer
    
I've seen cases a few hours where doing such sort of syntax on a slightly more complicated table cost my queries near 0.4s, I think COUNT(*) is a major culprit here, link to other question: stackoverflow.com/questions/20924951/… – skiwi Jan 4 '14 at 20:20

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