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I would like a simple way to represent the order of a list of objects. When an object changes position in that list I would like to update just one record. I don't know if this can be done but I'm interested to ask the SO hive...

Wish-list constraints

  • the algorithm (or data structure) should allow for items to be repositioned in the list by updating the properties of a single item
  • the algorithm (or data structure) should require no housekeeping to maintain the integrity of the list
  • the algorithm (or data structure) should allow for the insertion of new items or the removal of existing items

Why I care about only updating one item at a time...

[UPDATED to clarify question]

The use-case for this algorithm is a web application with a CRUDy, resourceful server setup and a clean (Angular) client.

It's good practice to keep to the pure CRUD actions where possible and makes for cleaner code all round. If I can do this operation in a single resource#update request then I don't need any additional serverside code to handle the re-ordering and it can all be done using CRUD with no alterations.

If more than one item in the list needs to be updated for each move then I need a new action on my controller to handle it. It's not a showstopper but it starts spilling over into Angular and everything becomes less clean than it ideally should be.


Example

Let's say we have a magazine and the magazine has a number of pages :

Original magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (page=1)
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (page=2)
- double page advert for Audi    (page=3)
- article by James May           (page=4)
- article by Richard Hammond     (page=5)
- advert for Volkswagen          (page=6)

Option 1: Store integer page numbers

... in which we update up to N records per move

If I want to pull Richard Hammond's page up from page 5 to page 2 I can do so by altering its page number. However I also have to alter all the pages which it then displaces:

Updated magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (page=1)
- article by Richard Hammond     (page=2)(old_value=5)*
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (page=3)(old_value=2)*
- double page advert for Audi    (page=4)(old_value=3)*
- article by James May           (page=5)(old_value=4)*
- advert for Volkswagen          (page=6)

* properties updated

However I don't want to update lots of records

- it doesn't fit my architecture

Let's say this is being done using javascript drag-n-drop re-ordering via Angular.js. I would ideally like to just update a value on the page which has been moved and leave the other pages alone. I want to send an http request to the CRUD resource for Richard Hammond's page saying that it's now been moved to the second page.

- and it doesn't scale

It's not a problem for me yet but at some point I may have 10,000 pages. I'd rather not update 9,999 of them when I move a new page to the front page.

Option 2: a linked list

... in which we update 3 records per move

If instead of storing the page's position, I instead store the page that comes before it then I reduce the number of actions from a maximum of N to 3.

Original magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (id = ford,         page_before = nil)
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (id = clarkson,     page_before = ford)
- article by James May           (id = captain_slow, page_before = clarkson)
- double page advert for Audi    (id = audi,         page_before = captain_slow)
- article by Richard Hammond     (id = hamster,      page_before = audi)
- advert for Volkswagen          (id = vw,           page_before = hamster)

again we move the cheeky hamster up...

Updated magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (id = ford,         page_before = nil)
- article by Richard Hammond     (id = hamster,      page_before = ford)*
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (id = clarkson,     page_before = hamster)*
- article by James May           (id = captain_slow, page_before = clarkson)
- double page advert for Audi    (id = audi,         page_before = captain_slow)
- advert for volkswagen          (id = vw,           page_before = audi)*

* properties updated

This requires updating three rows in the database: the page we moved, the page just below its old position and the page just below its new position.

It's better but it still involves updating three records and doesn't give me the resourceful CRUD behaviour I'm looking for.

Option 3: Non-integer positioning

...in which we update only 1 record per move (but need to housekeep)

Remember though, I still want to update only one record for each repositioning. In my quest to do this I take a different approach. Instead of storing the page position as an integer I store it as a float. This allows me to move an item by slipping it between two others:

Original magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (page=1.0)
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (page=2.0)
- double page advert for Audi    (page=3.0)
- article by James May           (page=4.0)
- article by Richard Hammond     (page=5.0)
- advert for Volkswagen          (page=6.0)

and then we move Hamster again:

Updated magazine
- double page advert for Ford    (page=1.0)
- article by Richard Hammond     (page=1.5)*
- article about Jeremy Clarkson  (page=2.0)
- double page advert for Audi    (page=3.0)
- article by James May           (page=4.0)
- advert for Volkswagen          (page=6.0)

* properties updated

Each time we move an item, we chose a value somewhere between the item above and below it (say by taking the average of the two items we're slipping between).

Eventually though you need to reset...

Whatever algorithm you use for inserting the pages into each other will eventually run out of decimal places since you have to keep using smaller numbers. As you move items more and more times you gradually move down the floating point chain and eventually need a new position which is smaller than anything available.

Every now and then you therefore have to do a reset to re-index the list and bring it all back within range. This is ok but I'm interested to see whether there is a way to encode the ordering which doesn't require this housekeeping.

Is there an algorithm which requires only 1 update and no housekeeping?

Does an algorithm (or perhaps more accurately, a data encoding) exist for this problem which requires only one update and no housekeeping? If so can you explain it in plain english how it works (i.g. no reference to directed graphs or vertices...)? Muchos gracias.

UPDATE (post points-awarding)

I've awarded the bounty on this to the question I feel had the most interesting answer. Nobody was able to offer a solution (since from the looks of things there isn't one) so I've not marked any particular question as correct.

Adjusting the no-housekeeping criterion

After having spent even more time thinking about this problem, it occurs to me that the housekeeping criterion should actually be adjusted. The real danger with housekeeping is not that it's a hassle to do but that it should ideally be robust to a client who has an outstanding copy of a pre-housekept set.

Let's say that Joe loads up a page containing a list (using Angular) and then goes off to make a cup of tea. Just after he downloads it the housekeeping happens and re-indexes all items (1000, 2000, 3000 etc).. After he comes back from his cup of tea, he moves an item from 1010 1011. There is a risk at this point that the re-indexing will place his item into a position it wasn't intended to go.

As a note for the future - any housekeeping algorithm should ideally be robust to items submitted across different housekept versions of the list too. Alternatively you should version the housekeeping and create an error if someone tries to update across versions.

Issues with the linked list

While the linked list requires only a few updates it's got some drawbacks too:

  • it's not trivial to deal with deletions from the list (and you may have to adjust your #destroy method accordingly
  • it's not easy to order the list for retrieval

The method I would choose

I think that having seen all the discussion, I think I would choose the non-integer (or string) positioning:

  • it's robust to inserts and deletions
  • it works of a single update

It does however need housekeeping and as mentioned above, if you're going to be complete you will also need to version each housekeeping and raise an error if someone tries to update based on a previous list version.

share|improve this question
7  
What would 1 update bring you that 3 updates wouldn't? Isn't 3 updates small enough? And are there any other criteria which should be taken into account? –  Robin Green Jan 4 at 21:23
3  
A list seems perfectly natural to me. –  A. Webb Jan 4 at 21:23
    
@RobinGreen I want to do a single update so that I can keep to a CRUDy resource model. I want to see if there's a solution that doesn't require adding a new action to the controller. –  Peter Nixey Jan 4 at 21:26
    
If it's one page per article, why not just use position in the list as your page number? (For what it's worth, the reason I considered this an Answer is that the request for an algorithm, and I provided one for that case. The fact that I didn't show code comes from the fact that with appropriate data structure choice no code is needed. And the request WAS for "plain english".) –  keshlam Jan 4 at 21:27
3  
Yeah, this is the problem with CRUD, it doesn't allow you to implement any complex server-side logic. With CRUD your controller is a glorified NoSQL database. I don't think that's a model worth clinging to. –  Robin Green Jan 4 at 21:29

9 Answers 9

@tmyklebu has the answer, but he never quite got to the punch line: The answer to your question is "no" unless you are willing to accept a worst case key length of n-1 bits to store n items.

This means that total key storage for n items is O(n^2).

There is an "adversary" information-theoretic argument that says no matter what scheme for assigning keys you choose for a database of n items, I can always come up with a series of n item re-positionings ("Move item k to position p.") that will force you to use a key with n-1 bits. Or by extension, if we start with an empty database, and you give me items to insert, I can choose a sequence of insertion positions that will require you to use at least zero bits for the first, one for the second, etc. indefinitely.

Edit

I earlier had an idea here about using rational numbers for keys. But it was more expensive than just adding one bit of length to split the gap between pairs of keys that differ by one. So I've removed it.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a really interesting answer and I'm almost with it except that I couldn't follow your algebra. Could you explain what gcd() is. Also I didn't understand why your key format was a fraction - w/x. Thank you –  Peter Nixey Jan 10 at 11:10
    
How is this better than the unbounded length string solution mentioned by tmyklebu? –  TMS Jan 11 at 13:17
    
Because you can always remove the gcd, on average the keys will have fewer bits. However in the worst case they are the same. @PeterNixey the formula just works out how to compute (a + b) / 2 in lowest terms and with small intermediate results. –  Gene Jan 11 at 15:36
    
Seems that everyone who sees this solution, including its author, just get's fascinated - "wow! rational numbers! So sophisticated! That must work!" It doesn't, unfortunatelly. This solution is much worse than the simple growing strings. Your numbers grow 4-6 bits per operation, instead of just 1 bit!. 9/14 has 4 + 4 = 8 bits, 19/21 has 5 + 5 = 10 bits, and your resultant number 65/84 has 7 + 7 = 14 bits!! And if you just look at those numbers, you see that 10/14 or 2/3 are much better solutions. Stop inventing the complexity, you cannot beat simple solutions. :-) See my answer. –  TMS Jan 12 at 13:13
    
@Gene: I do believe that there is such an adversary-argument for the 'naive' bit-string approach (naive, perhaps, but possibly still the most practical answer here), but that does not prove that a fundamentally different solution can't exist that satisfies the requirements of the problem. I'm not claiming with any degree of certainty that my own answer is such a solution, but if you could prove an asymptotic lower bound on its space-complexity, I'd be very interested in hearing your arguments. As far as I know, this is still an open question. –  mhelvens Jan 13 at 15:35

You can also interpret option 3 as storing positions as an unbounded-length string. That way you don't "run out of decimal places" or anything of that nature. Give the first item, say 'foo', position 1. Recursively partition your universe into "the stuff that's less than foo", which get a 0 prefix, and "the stuff that's bigger than foo", which get a 1 prefix.

This sucks in a lot of ways, notably that the position of an object can need as many bits to represent as you've done object moves.

share|improve this answer
    
I know, you're right on this. Of course it's only when I stop to think all of this through that I realise that any counting strategy is ultimately finite. However the string strategy definitely lasts longer than the integer or float one –  Peter Nixey Jan 6 at 23:03
1  
"the position of an object can need as many bits to represent as there are objects in the system" is not correct: it can need an unbounded number of bits (without housekeeping). E.g., take 4 items and keep inserting the last between the first and the second. –  Walter Tross Jan 8 at 15:27
    
@WalterTross: Whoops. You are correct. –  tmyklebu Jan 9 at 1:22

I was fascinated by this question, so I started working on an idea. Unfortunately, it's complicated (you probably knew it would be) and I don't have time to work it all out. I just thought I'd share my progress.

It's based on a doubly-linked list, but with extra bookkeeping information in every moved item. With some clever tricks, I suspect that each of the n items in the set will require less than O(n) extra space, even in the worst case, but I have no proof of this. It will also take extra time to figure out the view order.

For example, take the following initial configuration:

A  (-,B|0)
B  (A,C|0)
C  (B,D|0)
D  (C,E|0)
E  (D,-|0)

The top-to-bottom ordering is derived purely from the meta-data, which consists of a sequence of states (predecessor,successor|timestamp) for each item.

When moving D between A and B, you push a new state (A,B|1) to the front of its sequence with a fresh timestamp, which you get by incrementing a shared counter:

A  (-,B|0)
D  (A,B|1) (C,E|0)
B  (A,C|0)
C  (B,D|0)
E  (D,-|0)

As you see, we keep the old information around in order to connect C to E.

Here is roughly how you derive the proper order from the meta-data:

  1. You keep a pointer to A.
  2. A agrees it has no predecessor. So insert A. It leads you to B.
  3. B agrees it wants to be successor to A. So insert B after A. It leads you to C.
  4. C agrees it wants to be successor to B. So insert C after B. It leads you to D.
  5. D disagrees. It wants to be successor to A. Start recursion to insert it and find the real successor:
    1. D wins from B because it has a more recent timestamp. Insert D after A. It leads you to B.
    2. B is already D's successor. Look back in D's history, which leads you to E.
    3. E agrees it wants to be successor to D with timestamp 0. So return E.
  6. So the successor is E. Insert E after C. It tells you it has no successor. You are finished.

This is not exactly an algorithm yet, because it doesn't cover all cases. For example, when you move an item forwards instead of backwards. When moving B between D and E:

A  (-,B|0)
C  (B,D|0)
D  (C,E|0)
B  (D,E|1)(A,C|0)
E  (D,-|0)

The 'move' operation is the same. But the algorithm to derive the proper order is a bit different. From A it will run into B, able to get the real successor C from it, but with no place to insert B itself yet. You can keep it in reserve as a candidate for insertion after D, where it will eventually match timestamps against E for the privilege of that position.

I wrote some Angular.js code on Plunker that can be used as a starting-point to implement and test this algorithm. The relevant function is called findNext. It doesn't do anything clever yet.

There are optimizations to reduce the amount of metadata. For example, when moving an item away from where it was recently placed, and its neighbors are still linked of their own accord, you won't have to preserve its newest state but can just replace it. And there are probably situations where you can discard all of an item's sufficiently old states (when you move it).

It's a shame I don't have time to fully work this out. It's an interesting problem.

Good luck!


Edit: I felt I needed to clarify the above-mentioned optimization ideas. First, there is no need to push a new history configuration if the original links still hold. For example, it is fine to go from here (moved D between A and B):

A  (-,B|0)
D  (A,B|1) (C,E|0)
B  (A,C|0)
C  (B,D|0)
E  (D,-|0)

to here (then moved D between B and C):

A  (-,B|0)
B  (A,C|0)
D  (B,C|2) (C,E|0)
C  (B,D|0)
E  (D,-|0)

We are able to discard the (A,B|1) configuration because A and B were still connected by themselves. Any number of 'unrelated' movements can come inbetween without changing that.

Secondly, imagine that eventually C and E are moved away from each other, so the (C,E|0) configuration can be dropped the next time D is moved. This is trickier to prove, though.

All of this considered, I believe there is a good chance that the list requires less than O(n+k) space (n being the number of items in the list, k being the number of operations) in the worst case; especially in the average case.

The way to prove any of this is to come up with a simpler model for this data-structure, most likely based on graph theory. Again, I regret that I don't have time to work on this.

share|improve this answer
    
this could be an interesting starting point for a two-phase approach, with a housekeeping phase for cleaning up –  Walter Tross Jan 8 at 14:45
    
@WalterTross: Indeed. Of course, if you're going to do regular housekeeping anyway, there are solutions that are much simpler, like tmyklebu's of using strings. But with the 'no housekeeping' constraint, I suspect this one will be more managable if implemented properly. –  mhelvens Jan 8 at 14:58
    
This is really interesting. I'm going to go through it when I can to see if I can wrap my head around it but it's a solution entirely in the spirit of the problem so thank you (and for the code too) –  Peter Nixey Jan 8 at 16:05
1  
This will create a new corrector item for each operation in the worst case. So it is much worse than the simplest growing string solution that adds just one bit after each operation. –  TMS Jan 13 at 11:24
    
mhelvens, you were asking about my claim of memory requirements. Your solution will, in each operation in the worst case need to add one corrector item (predecessor,successor|timestamp). So, isn't it clear that your solution is worse than the simple growing string solution, where only one bit more is added? Isn't it clear that memory requirements of your solution are dependent on the number of operations, and can thus overgrow any O(N), even any O(function of N)? Isn't it clear that this solution doesn't stand the memory constraint? What is unclear about this claim? Please feel free to ask. –  TMS Jan 13 at 13:00

You should add one more sensible constraint to your wish-list:

  • max O(log N) space for each item (N being total number of items)

For example, the linked-list solution holds to this - you need at least N possible values for pointer, so the pointer takes up log N space. If you don't have this limit, trivial solution (growing strings) already mentioned by Lasse Karlsen and tmyklebu are solution to your problem, but the memory grows one character up (in the worst case) for each operation). You need some limit and this is a sensible one.

Then, hear the answer:

No, there is no such algorithm.

Well, this is a strong statement, and not easy to hear, so I guess proof is required :) I tried to figure out general proof, posted a question on Computer Science Theory, but the general proof is really hard to do. Say we make it easier and we will explicitly assume there are two classes of solutions:

  • absolute addressing - address of each item is specified by some absolute reference (integer, float, string)
  • relative addressing - address of each item is specified relatively to other items (e.g. the linked list, tree, etc.)

To disprove the existence of absolute addressing algorithm is easy. Just take 3 items, A, B, C, and keep moving the last one between the first two. You will soon run out of the possible combinations for the address of the moved element and will need more bits. You will break the constraint of the limited space.

Disproving the existence of relative addressing is also easy. For non-trivial arrangement, certainly some two different positions exist to which some other items are referring to. Then if you move some item between these two positions, at least two items have to be changed - the one which referred to the old position and the one which will refer to the new position. This violates the constraint of only one item changed.

Q.E.D.

Don't be fascinated by complexity - it doesn't work

Now that we (and you) can admit your desired solution does not exist, why would you complicate your life with complex solution that do not work? They can't work, as we proved above. I think we got lost here. Guys here spent immense effort just to end up with overly complicated solutions that are even worse than the simplest solution proposed:

  • Gene's rational numbers - they grow 4-6 bits in his example, instead of just 1 bit which is required by the most trivial algorithm (described below). 9/14 has 4 + 4 = 8 bits, 19/21 has 5 + 5 = 10 bits, and the resultant number 65/84 has 7 + 7 = 14 bits!! And if we just look at those numbers, we see that 10/14 or 2/3 are much better solutions. It can be easily proven that the growing string solution is unbeatable, see below.

  • mhelvens' solution - in the worst case he will add a new correcting item after each operation. This will for sure occupy much more than one bit more.

These guys are very clever but obviously cannot bring something sensible. Someone has to tell them - STOP, there's no solution, and what you do simply can't be better than the most trivial solution you are afraid to offer :-)

Go back to square one, go simple

Now, go back to the list of your restrictions. One of them must be broken, you know that. Go through the list and ask, which one of these is least painful?

1) Violate memory constraint

This is hard to violate infinitely, because you have limited space... so be prepared to also violate the housekeeping constraint from time to time.

The solution to this is the solution already proposed by tmyklebu and mentioned by Lasse Karlsen - growing strings. Just consider binary strings of 0 and 1. You have items A, B and C and moving C between A and B. If there is no space between A and B, i.e. they look

A  xxx0 
B  xxx1

Then just add one more bit for C:

A  xxx0
C  xxx01
B  xxx1

In worst case, you need 1 bit after every operation. You can also work on bytes, not bits. Then in the worst case, you will have to add one byte for every 8 operations. It's all the same. And, it can be easily seen that this solution cannot be beaten. You must add at least one bit, and you cannot add less. In other words, no matter how the solution is complex, it can't be better than this.

Pros:

  • you have one update per item
  • can compare any two elements, but slow

Cons:

  • comparing or sorting will get very very slow as the strings grow
  • there will be a housekeeping

2) Violate one item modified constraint

This leads to the original linked-list solution. Also, there are plenty of balanced tree data structures, which are even better if you need to look up or compare items (which you didn't mention).

These can go with 3 items modified, balanced trees sometimes need more (when balance operations are needed), but as it is amortized O(1), in a long row of operations the number of modifications per operation is constant. In your case, I would use tree solution only if you need to look up or compare items. Otherwise, the linked-list solution rocks. Throwing it out just because they need 3 operations instead of 1? C'mon :)

Pros:

  • optimal memory use
  • fast generation of ordered list (one linear pass), no need to sort
  • fast operations
  • no housekeeping

Cons:

  • cannot easily compare two items. Can easily generate the order of all the items, but given two items randomly, comparing them will take O(N) for list and O(log N) for balanced trees.
  • 3 modified items instead of 1 (... letting up to you how much of a "con" this is)

3) Violate "no housekeeping" constraint

These are the solution with integers and floats, best described by Lasse Karlsen here. Also, the solutions from point 1) will fall here :). The key question was already mentioned by Lasse:

How often will housekeeping have to take place?

If you will use k-bit integers, then from the optimal state, when items are spread evenly in the integer space, the housekeeping will have to take place every k - log N operations, in the worst-case. You might then use more ore less sophisticated algorithms to restrict the number of items you "housekeep".

Pros:

  • optimal memory use
  • fast operation
  • can compare any two elements
  • one item modified per operation

Cons:

  • housekeeping

Conclusion - hope never dies

I think the best way, and the answers here prove that, is to decide which one of those constraints is least pain and just take one of those simple solutions formerly frowned upon.

But, hope never dies. When writing this, I realized that there would be your desired solution, if we just were able to ask the server!! Depends on the type of the server of course, but the classical SQL server already has the trees/linked-list implemented - for indices. The server is already doing the operations like "move this item before this one in the tree"!! But the server is doing based on the data, not based on our request. If we were able somehow to ask server to do this without the need to create perverse, endlessly growing data, that would be your desired solution! As I said, the server already does it - the solution is sooo close, but so far. If you can write your own server, you can do it :-)

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What a great answer - I'm going to read through this in more detail tomorrow - thank you –  Peter Nixey Jan 12 at 13:32
    
Thanks @PeterNixey, you are welcome! –  TMS Jan 13 at 11:26
    
This answer is not convincing. You keep using the word "proof", but you offer no proof. You say things like "easy", "obvious" and "certainly", and then use unjustified intuitive leaps. My own proposed solution is a counterexample: it uses relative positioning, yet requires only one item to change. You say it needs O(n) space per item worst case, but don't even try to justify the claim. I don't think it's true. --- That said, I do agree that 'CRUD purity' is probably not worth the cost for a real-life application. Unfortunately, practicality always falls short of that kind of academic elegance. –  mhelvens Jan 13 at 12:30
    
1) The general proof that the algorithm doesn't exsist is very hard, I have admitted that. I offer proof of a little weaker theorem where we suppose that algorithms will be of certain type. This assumption fits to all proposals here, so I think we generalize this weaker theorem to statement that there's no such algorithm. 2) let's discuss your solution under your answer. –  TMS Jan 13 at 12:52
    
Tomas, I'm going to give you the points for this as I think you've given the most interesting explanation of many of the points other people have made as well as other aspects of this. However I do agree with @mhelvens in that you have made a lot of statements about things being "trivial" or "easily provable" which I don't think are really the case. I'd like to award you the points but if you have a minute I think it would be good to make your points sound less certain and more indicative. I feel that will make this a better reference for the question. –  Peter Nixey Jan 13 at 18:45

Your best option is "Option 3", although "non-integer" doesn't necessarily have to be involved.

"Non-integer" can mean anything that have some kind of accuracy definition, which means:

  • Integers (you just don't use 1, 2, 3, etc.)
  • Strings (you just tuck on more characters to ensure the proper "sort order")
  • Floating point values (adding more decimal points, somewhat the same as strings)

In each case you're going to have accuracy problems. For floating point types, there might be a hard limit in the database engine, but for strings, the limit will be the amount of space you allow for this. Please note that your question can be understood to mean "with no limits", meaning that for such a solution to work, you really need infinite accuracy/space for the keys.

However, I think that you don't need that.

Let's assume that you initially allocate every 1000th index to each row, meaning you will have:

1000  A
2000  B
3000  C
4000  D
... and so on

Then you move as follows:

  • D up between A and B (gets index 1500)
  • C up between A and D (gets index 1250)
  • B up between A and C (gets index 1125)
  • D up between A and B (gets index 1062)
  • C up between A and D (gets index 1031)
  • B up between A and C (gets index 1015)
  • D up between A and B (gets index 1007)
  • C up between A and D (gets index 1004)
  • B up between A and C (gets index 1002)
  • D up between A and B (gets index 1001)

At this point, the list looks like this:

1000  A
1001  D
1002  B
1004  C

Now, then you want to move C up between A and D.

This is currently not possible, so you're going to have to renumber some items.

You can get by by updating B to have number 1003, trying to update the minimum number of rows, and thus you get:

1000  A
1001  C
1002  D
1003  B

but now, if you want to move B up between A and C, you're going to renumber everything except A.

The question is this: How likely is it that you have this pathological sequence of events?

If the answer is very likely then you will have problems, regardless of what you do.

If the answer is likely seldom, then you might decide that the "problems" with the above approach are manageable. Note that renumbering and ordering more than one row will likely be the exceptions here, and you would get something like "amortized 1 row updated per move". Amortized means that you spread the cost of those occasions where you have to update more than one row out over all the other occasions where you don't.

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I agree. Your comments are all correct. They all make a lot of sense too but it all still goes to the housekeeping (eventually). I know that's unlikely but this is perhaps more of a puzzle experiment to see if there's a way to do it without that –  Peter Nixey Jan 6 at 23:05

I am unsure if you will call this cheating, but why not create a separate page list resource that references the page resources? If you change the order of the pages you need not update any of the pages, just the list that stores the order if the IDs.

Original page list

[ford, clarkson, captain_slow, audi, hamster, vw]

Update to

[ford, hamster, clarkson, captain_slow, audi, vw]

Leave the page resources untouched.

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Does this change anything? If you had 10,000 records in there would you update all of them? I'm not quite sure how you envisage this working –  Peter Nixey Jan 7 at 10:42
    
If you have 10,000 records in the list, you leave all 10,000 resources untouched, but update the single list resource, from a string containing a list of 10,000 page IDs to a different string containing the updated list of 10,000 page IDs. –  flup Jan 7 at 10:51
    
I don't think this would fit the job unfortunately. You couldn't easily select a paginated set of records from the database and anytime you created or destroyed a record you'd have to independently manage this list of indices. I think it falls down on the housekeeping criterion. –  Peter Nixey Jan 7 at 11:35

You could always store the ordering permutation separately as a ln(num_records!)/ln(2) bit bitstring and figure out how to transform/CRUD that yourself so that you'd only need to update a single bit for simple operations, if updating 2/3 records is not good enough for you.

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What about the following very simple algorithm:

(let's take the analogy with page numbers in a book)

If you move a page to become the "new" page 3, you now have "at least" one page 3, possibly two, or even more. So, which one is the "right" page 3?

Solution: the "newest". So, we make use of the fact that a record also has an "updated date/time", to determine who the real page 3 is.

If you need to represent the entire list in its right order, you have to sort with two keys, one for the page number, and one for the "updated date/time" field.

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I thought about exactly the same thing. Unfortunately as you work it through it gets harder. Once you've got four items placed on spot #2, how do you place one between two of them? –  Peter Nixey Jan 13 at 18:27
    
Very good remark. It was simply looking too promising to be true... –  Danny Jan 13 at 18:57

What if you store the original order and don't change it after saving it once and then store the number of increments up the list or down the list?

Then by moving something up 3 levels you would store this action only.

in the database you can then order by a mathematically counted column.

First time insert:

ord1 | ord2 | value
-----+------+--------
1    | 0    | A
2    | 0    | B
3    | 0    | C
4    | 0    | D
5    | 0    | E
6    | 0    | F

Update order, move D up 2 levels

ord1 | ord2 | value | ord1 + ord2
-----+------+-------+-------------
1    | 0    | A     | 1
2    | 0    | B     | 2
3    | 0    | C     | 3
4    | -2   | D     | 2
5    | 0    | E     | 5
6    | 0    | F     | 6

Order by ord1 + ord2

ord1 | ord2 | value | ord1 + ord2
-----+------+-------+-------------
1    | 0    | A     | 1
2    | 0    | B     | 2
4    | -2   | D     | 2
3    | 0    | C     | 3
5    | 0    | E     | 5
6    | 0    | F     | 6

Order by ord1 + ord2 ASC, ord2 ASC

ord1 | ord2 | value | ord1 + ord2
-----+------+-------+-------------
1    | 0    | A     | 1
4    | -2   | D     | 2
2    | 0    | B     | 2
3    | 0    | C     | 3
5    | 0    | E     | 5
6    | 0    | F     | 6

Move E up 4 levels

ord1 | ord2 | value | ord1 + ord2
-----+------+-------+-------------
5    | -4   | E     | 1
1    | 0    | A     | 1
4    | -2   | D     | 2
2    | 0    | B     | 2
3    | 0    | C     | 3
6    | 0    | F     | 6

Something like relative ordering, where ord1 is the absolute order while ord2 is the relative order.

Along with the same idea of just storing the history of movements and sorting based on that.

Not tested, not tried, just wrote down what I thought at this moment, maybe it can point you in some direction :)

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