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I just picked up "Jumping into C++" yesterday and decided to venture out on my own. Familiar with "if" statements oh so long ago with Java, I did this for fun:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int first;
    int second;
    int choice;
    int final;
    cout << "Enter your first number:" <<;
    endl;
    cin >> first >> ;
    cout << "Enter your second number:" <<;
    endl;
    cin >> second >> ;
    cout << "Would you like to 1. Add 2. Subtract 3. Multiply 4. Or divide these                numbers?" << endl;
if (choice = 1){
    final = first + second;
    cout << "Your answer is: " << final <<;
    return 0;
}
if (choice = 2){
    final = first - second;
    cout << "Your answer is: " << final <<;
    return 0;
}
if (choice = 3){
    final = first * second;
    cout << "Your answer is: " << final <<;
    return 0;

}
if (choice = 4){
    final = first / second;
    cout << "Your answer is: " << final <<;
    return 0;
}
else{
    cout << "You probably typed something wrong! Remember, hit your number and hit enter, nothing else!" << endl;
    cout << "Ending program." << endl;
    return 0;
}

}

Why can't this program run properly?

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closed as off-topic by leemes, iandotkelly, torazaburo, Codie CodeMonkey, the Tin Man Jan 5 at 6:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions concerning problems with code you've written must describe the specific problem — and include valid code to reproduce it — in the question itself. See SSCCE.org for guidance." – iandotkelly, Codie CodeMonkey, the Tin Man
  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – leemes, torazaburo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
In C++, as in Java, = means "assign" while == means "compare for equality". –  Igor Tandetnik Jan 5 at 0:36
2  
Something else to learn is how to describe problems. You asked "Why can't this program run properly?" but didn't describe what it does when it runs, and what you expected it. Don't assume we know how your program is supposed to work. You have to tell us what you wanted, and what you got instead. –  Andy Lester Jan 5 at 0:54

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You still have more problems:

cin >> first >> ;

Note the last >>. That's not valid code, it's a syntax error. Your compiler should have told you about that.

You have a lot of these all over your program. Remove the last >> or << that doesn't have a value proceeding them. That should clear the majority of your errors.

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The operator to check for equality is ==, not =

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= stands for assignment, == stands for test for equality. Change if(choice = 1) to if(choice==1) and like so for the rest of the if statements.

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The clause choice = 1 assigns choice to 1, then the if statement checks to see whether choice is non-zero. This means that all of the bodies of the if statements will execute. You meant choice == 1, which checks to see if choice equals 1.

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In your if statments you should use the Comparison operators ( e.g == ) but you're using the Assignment operator ( = ).

Check this for more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operators_in_C_and_C++

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