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Let's say I have a WAV file. I downloaded Synthesis Tool Kit to use for reading/writing of these files.

I know I will need to figure out how to load up the file to be read, and afterwards get the sampling rate of the file, but I'm stuck after that. What do I need to do to grab the decibel values of this file? I want my audio processing to recognize what is noise and how to ignore it, while performing a FFT on when actual sound from my sensor is recorded.

Here is a picture of what my files look like when I open them with Audacity, while viewing them as Waveform(dB) as selected from a drop-down menu.

How do I get this type of data returned to me with the libraries available for C++?

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I would start by understanding what a measurement in dB actually is: It's not a absolute measurement, but rather a ratio. In this context it is usually ratio of signal to the largest sample value the system is capable of holding. Aside from that, your question is too broad. We welcome specific questions, preferably with a code example demonstrating an attempt at a problem. –  marko Jan 5 at 10:31
    
To get even more basic, let's emphasize that dB is a unit of measurement. It sounds like you are really interested in reading the sample, or "waveform", values, rather than reading units of measurement, which are not contained in the file. (Audacity calls this dB simply because they put a log scale next to it, not because the data itself is actually "in dB" in any meaningful sense). Once you have the sample values, you could convert them into dB (although, as marko pointed out, you need a reference, so you usually convert to dBFS, not bare dB), but that's another question. –  Bjorn Roche Jan 5 at 16:14
    
From what I understand, the WAV file contains the magnitude values. From this to the dB scale, would that simply be converting the magnitude graph to a log scale? –  Toritos Dacos Jan 5 at 23:53
    
If you want to do analysis on the sound, like FFTs and noise removal, etc, you don't want to use dB. So asking about dB and putting it forward as your main question really makes no sense. Instead of asking on SO, which is for specific programming questions, you'd probably do better to either learn more about working with audio data, or find a different and more appropriate forum. –  tom10 Jan 6 at 2:42

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