Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In the following vim macro from this article, the author gives an explanation. I understand some but not everything.

:qccwcommand<Esc>:w<Ctl-W>jj<Enter>q

This macro (which includes the record start / stop, if you’re wondering) will change the current ‘path_to_command’ word to ‘command’, write the file out to disk, change window splits to the grep search results, move down one line in the results and navigate to that result’s location.

Q1. What is ccw doing here? Is it something to do with cw (change word) but I am not sure.

Q2. :w must be to write, right?.

Q3. What is <Ctrl-W>jj doing here? The following is what :h CTRL-W_J is about but I am not sure if I am looking into the correct help nor the meaning of the help in this context.

                                        *CTRL-W_J*
CTRL-W J    Move the current window to be at the very bottom, using the
    full width of the screen.  This works like closing the current
    window and then creating another one with ":botright split",
    except that the current window contents is used for the new
    window.

I thank you in advance for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Try typing the macro in yourself, you'll see what it does. – jthill Jan 5 '14 at 5:55
    
(I mean without the qc leader and q trailer) – jthill Jan 5 '14 at 5:55

you're confused because ccw taken literally in that sequence of commands dosen't really make sense!

the initial qc means "start macro recording in register c"

then the next cw means change word (e.g. delete the next word and leave editor in insert mode)

also notice that the final command is a q: this means to finish the macro recording. Macros are super useful when doing things that require a lot of repetition!!1 --> http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Macros


then, his explanation in the blog post contains the answer to Q2 and Q3

This macro (which includes the record start / stop, if you’re wondering)
will change the current ‘path_to_command’ word to ‘command’, write the file
out to disk, change window splits to the grep search results, move down one
line in the results and navigate to that result’s location. I ran the macro
by hitting @c and then verifying the line selected was one that I wanted to
change. For a few instances where I did not want to change the line, I
manually navigated to the next search result and then re-ran the @c macro.

Q2 - yup, to save the file: "write the file out to disk"

Q3 - the <Ctl-W>jj<Enter> is a sequence of Vim key commands to move to the next entry in the quickfix window from the vimgrep, as he indicates: "write the file out to disk, change window splits to the grep search results, move down one line in the results and navigate to that result’s location."

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.