Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
Dim x As Integer = 1.8 \ 1 

Error:

Option Strict On disallows implicit conversions from 'Double' to 'Long'

What Long??

EDIT:

Apparently Visual Basic attempts to convert any floating-point numeric expression to Long. OK, this part is clear.

Now, I can use the

CType((Math.Round(myResultingSingle)), Integer)

but what for MSDN tells that \ operator supports all the types if in reality it supports only Long as expression1 ?!...

share|improve this question
    
What is your expected result? Also note that a conversion normally would use banker's rounding (if Option Strict is off). –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Jan 19 '10 at 11:52
    
@divo: x should be 2... or 1.. finally, I would like to eliminate the error, then see the (default) result. –  serhio Jan 19 '10 at 11:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The integer division operator requires integral operands. Two possible ways to do it:

  • Dim x As Integer = CInt(1.8) \ 2
  • Dim x As Integer = CInt(1.8 / 2)
share|improve this answer
    
so, only integral operands are supported by \, not all(including floating point), how pretends MSDN. –  serhio Jan 19 '10 at 12:32
2  
@serhio: As Grzegorz Gierlik pointed out, you can use a floating point number only with Option Strict Off. It's clearly stated on MSDN. –  Meta-Knight Jan 19 '10 at 13:50

From the MSDN page \ Operator (Visual Basic) :

Before performing the division, Visual Basic attempts to convert any floating-point numeric expression to Long

That Long. Because Double to Long is a narrowing conversion, and Option Strict is on, you must explicitly ask for it to happen.

share|improve this answer
    
from the same MSDN page: Supported Types: All numeric types, including the unsigned and floating-point types and Decimal. in reality, only Long is supported as expression1.. :( –  serhio Jan 19 '10 at 11:45
    
@serhio: Could it be that you are looking for the / operator instead? –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Jan 19 '10 at 11:50
    
@divo: as you can see, x is an Integer, so I need a integer division. x = 1 or 2...mdeas... –  serhio Jan 19 '10 at 11:54

Here (in Remarks section) is the answer:

Before performing the division, Visual Basic attempts to convert any floating-point numeric expression to Long. If Option Strict is On, a compiler error occurs.

share|improve this answer
    
Visual Basic attempts to convert any floating-point numeric expression to Long... So what should I do? MSDN tells also that all types are supported, but in reality is Long only?!. –  serhio Jan 19 '10 at 11:43
    
You have to convert double to integer type. See @nobugz answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/2093067/… –  Grzegorz Gierlik Jan 19 '10 at 13:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.