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I have a 2D array like below. ( array[5][2] )

20 11

10 20

39 14

29 15

22 23

after sorting it should be like below.

10 20

20 11

22 23

29 15

39 14

that means the array should be sorted comparing the first coloum values only.

In Java there is a built in function capability to do that. like below.

Arrays.sort(a, new Comparator<Long[]>() {

            @Override
            public int compare(Long[] o1, Long[] o2) {

                Long t1 = o1[1];
                Long p1 = o1[0];
                Long t2 = o2[1];
                Long p2 = o2[0];

                if (t1 == t2) {
                    return (p1 > p2 ? 1 : (p1 == p2 ? 0 : -1));
                } else {
                    return (t1 < t2 ? -1 : 1);
                }

            }
        });

So is there any C++ built in function capability to do these kind of stuff or how can i do this in C++ (the fastest implementation) ?

thanks in advance :)

share|improve this question
    
How did you declare array[5][2]. are they just int's or did you use a STL container like std::vector, std::array ect...? – Bo M. Petersen Jan 5 '14 at 9:02
1  
As odd as it sounds, std::qsort() may be an easier built-in to wedge-fit into a classic 2D array when sorting by single column. – WhozCraig Jan 5 '14 at 9:14
1  
std::sort accepts a comparator as the third argument. Any op such that op(a,b) means a < b is fine – function, lambda, functor object. Due to inlining, it’s usually faster than qsort with the same function, too. – Christopher Creutzig Jan 5 '14 at 9:46

I'm offering this up only because it was one of the few things std::qsort does well that std::sort simply does not, namely sort multi-column fixed arrays: The comparator is a string of ternary statements, but should be clear enough if you stare at it long enough:

#include <iostream>
#include <random>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    int ar[10][2];

    // populate with random data
    std::random_device rd;
    std::default_random_engine rng(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dist(1,20);
    std::for_each(std::begin(ar), std::end(ar),
        [&](int (&ar)[2]){ ar[0] = dist(rng); ar[1] = dist(rng); });

    std::cout << "Before Sort..." << '\n';
    std::for_each(std::begin(ar), std::end(ar),
        [](const int(&ar)[2]) { std::cout << ar[0] << ',' << ar[1] << '\n';});

    std::qsort(ar, 10, sizeof(*ar),
        [](const void *arg1, const void *arg2)->int
        {
            int const *lhs = static_cast<int const*>(arg1);
            int const *rhs = static_cast<int const*>(arg2);
            return (lhs[0] < rhs[0]) ? -1
                :  ((rhs[0] < lhs[0]) ? 1
                :  (lhs[1] < rhs[1] ? -1
                :  ((rhs[1] < lhs[1] ? 1 : 0))));
        });

    std::cout << "After Sort..." << '\n';
    std::for_each(std::begin(ar), std::end(ar),
        [](const int(&ar)[2]) { std::cout << ar[0] << ',' << ar[1] << '\n';});

    return 0;
}

Sample Run (yours will vary, obviously)

Before Sort...
2,11
18,4
20,20
14,6
8,10
17,8
14,14
3,10
20,14
19,19
After Sort...
2,11
3,10
8,10
14,6
14,14
17,8
18,4
19,19
20,14
20,20

Notes: this specifically uses strict-value comparison rather than subtraction short-cuts in the comparator so as to avoid potential underflow issues. If that is not a problem in your restricted data-space, you could easily make that comparator significantly simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the code will give error C2664: 'qsort' : cannot convert parameter 4 from 'anonymous-namespace'::<lambda2>' to 'int (__cdecl *)(const void *,const void *)'` under VS? – herohuyongtao Jan 5 '14 at 9:39
1  
Why do you think std::sort(std::begin(ar), std::end(ar), [](int const (&ar)[2])->bool{…} wouldn’t work just as well? – Christopher Creutzig Jan 5 '14 at 9:40
1  
@ChristopherCreutzig Have you tried it? std::sort uses move and value assignment, and fixed C arrays are not assignable by-value (though they can be initialized). So to answer the question you posed, because it wouldn't work at all, therefore it wouldn't work as well. – WhozCraig Jan 5 '14 at 10:46
    
@herohuyongtao That would be the fault of MS, but you can get around it by moving the lambda to its own static function. the rest would be the same. – WhozCraig Jan 5 '14 at 10:50
    
@WhozCraig I see, thanks. – herohuyongtao Jan 5 '14 at 10:53

If you can, use Vector with some struct to hold two int:

typedef std::pair<int, int> pairType;
std::vector<pairType> vec;

// Initialize vector

std::sort(std::begin(vec), std::end(vec), [](pairType& first, pairType& second)->bool { return first.first < second.first });
share|improve this answer

The built-in arrays of C and C++ are very inflexible, among other things they cannot be assigned.

Your best option would be the 'array' class from the C++ standard library, at least for the inner dimension:

array<int, 2> a[5] = { { 20, 11 },
{ 10, 20 },
{ 39, 14 },
{ 29, 15 },
{ 22, 23 } };

sort( a, a + 5 );

Edit: Some more explanations.

Here we use the property of std::array that '<' by default compares them lexicographically, i.e. starts with the first element. In order to sort things differently we have to come up with an comparator object, so if you want to use the second column as sort key you have to do this:

auto comp = []( const array<int, 2>& u, const array<int, 2>& v )
      { return u[1] < v[1]; };
sort( a, a + 5, comp );

And as mentioned in the first comment, sort(a, a+5 ... is just an ugly short form for the cleaner sort(std::begin(a), std::end(a) ...

share|improve this answer
5  
use std::begin(a) and std::end(a) instead of a and a + 5. – Jarod42 Jan 5 '14 at 9:16
3  
How about sorting based on the second elements? – herohuyongtao Jan 5 '14 at 9:23
2  
@herohuyongtao: sort( a, a + 5, []( array<int, 2>& u, array<int, 2>& v ){ return u[1] < v[1]; } ); – pentadecagon Jan 5 '14 at 9:50

If end container doesn't matter, how about using a map ?

#include<map>

std::map<int, int> m;

for(std::size_t i = 0; i < 5; ++i )
    m[array[i][0]] = array[i][1] ;

You can now copy m back to your array

std::size_t  i=0;
for(const auto& x:m)
{   
    array[i][0] = x.first ;
    array[i++][1] = x.second ;
}
share|improve this answer

The fastest way to sort a 2D array in time(using only columns) . . .will cost you reference locality... Else, every other way will involve lots of copying of rows.. . . Though (C++'s move operations may cushion this)

You would create a new array of pointers to a 2D array... Then sort the pointers...

Else, every other answer before mine seems good. But I advise you to use std::array.

share|improve this answer

First off, if you'd given vector<vector<int>> array this would be sortable just using: sort(begin(array), end(array)) because vector defines lexicographic comparison functions: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector/operator_cmp

That said, there are drawbacks to using a vector-of-vectors: What are the Issues with a vector-of-vectors? and it's clearly not what you intended. Given int array[5][2] trying to use sort will yield:

error C3863: array type 'int [2]' is not assignable

Instead of using swap to exchange 2 int[2]s we need to simply need to swap bytes of sizeof(*array), that can be accomplished using qsort as suggested by WhozCraig's answer, but we can improve upon that making our comparator capable of handling any size sub-array. Given int array[5][2] or whatever dimensions are desired we can write:

static const auto SIZE = size(*array);   

qsort(array, size(array), sizeof(*array), [](const auto lhs, const auto rhs) {
    const auto first = reinterpret_cast<const int*>(lhs);
    const auto last = next(first, SIZE);
    const auto its = mismatch(first, last, reinterpret_cast<const int*>(rhs));

    if (its.first == last) {
        return 0;
    } else if (*its.first < *its.second) {
        return -1;
    } else {
        return 1;
    }});

A quick note array should not be used as a variable name as it defines a standard type, with this change you can find an example here: http://ideone.com/87AoIr

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