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I'm running some experiments, based on the .NET thread safe, and non-thread safe dictionary's, as well as my custom one.

The results for writing 20,000,000 (20 million) ints to each are as follows:

  1. Non-thread safe: 909 milliseconds (less then 1 second) Dictionary
  2. Thread safe: 11914 milliseconds (more then 11 seconds) ConcurrentDictionary
  3. Custom: 909 milliseconds (less then 1 second) 2 dictionary's
  4. Thread safe (ConcurrentTryAdd): 12697 milliseconds (more then 12 seconds) No better then #2

These tests were conducted in a single threaded environment, I'm trying to get the speed of the non-thread safe dictionary, with the safety of the thread safe one.

The results are promising so far, I'm surprised how poorly the ConcurrentDictionary handled, maybe its meant for certain scenarios only?

Anyway, below is the code I used to test the three dictionary's, can you tell me if my custom one is thread safe? Do I have to add a lock to if (_list.ContainsKey(threadId))? I don't think so since its only a read, and when the dictionary has an element added to it (a write) its protected by a lock, blocking other threads trying to read it.

There is no locks once the thread has the dictionary, because another thread cannot write to that same dictionary, since each thread gets their own dictionary (based on the ManagedThreadId), making it as safe as a single thread.

Main

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            int i = 20000000;  // 20 million

            IWork work = new Custom(); // Replace with: Control(), Concurrent(), or Custom()
            work.Start(i);

            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Total time: {0}\r\nPress anykey to continue...", sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}

Non-thread safe

using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class Control : IWork
    {
        public void Start(int i)
        {
            var list = new Dictionary<int, int>();
            for (int n = 0; n < i; n++)
            {
                list.Add(n, n);
            }
        }
    }
}

Thread safe

using System.Collections.Concurrent;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class Concurrent : IWork
    {
        public void Start(int i)
        {
            var list = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, int>();
            for (int n = 0; n < i; n++)
            {
                list.AddOrUpdate(n, n, (a, b) => b);
            }
        }
    }
}

Thread Safe (try add)

using System.Collections.Concurrent;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class ConcurrentTryAdd : IWork
    {
        public void Start(int i)
        {
            var list = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, int>();
            for (int n = 0; n < i; n++)
            {
                bool result = list.TryAdd(n, n);
                if (!result)
                {
                    n--;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Custom

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class Custom : IWork
    {
        private static Dictionary<int, Dictionary<int, int>> _list = null;

        static Custom()
        {
            _list = new Dictionary<int, Dictionary<int, int>>();
        }

        public void Start(int i)
        {
            int threadId = Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId;

            Dictionary<int, int> threadList = null;
            bool firstTime = false;

            lock (_list)
            {
                if (_list.ContainsKey(threadId))
                {
                     threadList = _list[threadId];
                }
                else
                {
                    threadList = new Dictionary<int, int>();
                    firstTime = true;
                 }
            }

            for (int n = 0; n < i; n++)
            {
                threadList.Add(n, n);
            }

            if (firstTime)
            {
                lock (_list)
                {
                    _list.Add(threadId, threadList);
                }
            }

        }
    }
}

IWorK

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    public interface IWork
    {
        void Start(int i);
    }
}

Multi-threaded Example

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace LockFreeTests
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            int totalWork = 20000000;  // 20 million
            int cores = Environment.ProcessorCount;
            int workPerCore = totalWork / cores;

            IWork work = new Custom(); // Replace with: Control(), Concurrent(), ConcurrentTryAdd(), or Custom()
            var tasks = new Task[cores];

            for (int n = 0; n < cores; n++)
            {
                tasks[n] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                    {
                        work.Start(workPerCore);
                    });
            }

            Task.WaitAll(tasks);
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("Total time: {0}\r\nPress anykey to continue...", sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
            Console.ReadKey(true);
        }
    }
}

The above code runs in 528 milliseconds, that's a 40% speed improvement (from the single thread test)

share|improve this question
    
Will multiple threads work on the same list in the custom scenario? You check if this is the "first time", and then you put the dictionary into the list with the thread id. What happens when/if the thread id is reused? Also, you should lock around the check if the list is in the dictionary in the first place. The internal data structure of the dictionary is volatile while being updated, you should not try to read from it while that happens. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 5 '14 at 13:06
    
And why store it outside the method, why not just create a dictionary and store it in a local variable? What is this code supposed to measure/prove/disprove? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 5 '14 at 13:12
    
@LasseV.Karlsen yes the custom one is menat for multi-threaded environments. –  user1515024 Jan 5 '14 at 13:17
    
@HenkHolterman I will test the try Add and update the question with the results. As for why its a dictionary it was just a random choice, nothing special. The end goal is to increase my working knowledge of threads, and in this case to get a fast thread safe generic list to read and write from. –  user1515024 Jan 5 '14 at 13:19
    
@HenkHolterman The result of TryAdd was the same as AddOrUpdate. –  user1515024 Jan 5 '14 at 13:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not thread-safe.

Do I have to add a lock to if (_list.ContainsKey(threadId))? I don't think so since its only a read, and when the dictionary has an element added to it (a write) its protected by a lock, blocking other threads trying to read it.

Yes, you do need a lock here to make it thread-safe.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also, he has the standard misconception about what a lock does, it does not prevent other threads for using the object being locked, except if they too lock on the same object. Since reading does not lock, it will read just fine while the lock is in place. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 5 '14 at 13:07
    
@Joe I made the read locked, now is it thread safe? –  user1515024 Jan 5 '14 at 13:14
    
@LasseV.Karlsen Thanks I did have that misconception, know I now better. –  user1515024 Jan 5 '14 at 13:15
    
Note that managed thread ids will be reused. Once a thread finishes, its id can be reused. It's not just theoretical either, out of 1000 threads I created here, I got only 442 unique ids. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jan 5 '14 at 13:16
1  
I'd say it is now thread-safe, though it doesn't do anything useful in its current form, and isn't equivalent to the alternate versions. –  Joe Jan 5 '14 at 13:19

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