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I'm trying to analyse the weather records for New York, using the daily data taken from here: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/daily_doc.html

I'm loading the data with:

tf = pandas.read_fwf(io.open('state30_NY.txt'), widths=widths, names=names, na_values=['-9999'])

Where:

>>> widths
[6, 4, 2, 4, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1, 5, 1, 1, 1]
>>> names
['COOP', 'YEAR', 'MONTH', 'ELEMENT', 'VALUE1', 'MFLAG1', 'QFLAG1', 'SFLAG1', 'VALUE2', 'MFLAG2', 'QFLAG2', 'SFLAG2', 'VALUE3', 'MFLAG3', 'QFLAG3', 'SFLAG3', 'VALUE4', 'MFLAG4', 'QFLAG4', 'SFLAG4', 'VALUE5', 'MFLAG5', 'QFLAG5', 'SFLAG5', 'VALUE6', 'MFLAG6', 'QFLAG6', 'SFLAG6', 'VALUE7', 'MFLAG7', 'QFLAG7', 'SFLAG7', 'VALUE8', 'MFLAG8', 'QFLAG8', 'SFLAG8', 'VALUE9', 'MFLAG9', 'QFLAG9', 'SFLAG9', 'VALUE10', 'MFLAG10', 'QFLAG10', 'SFLAG10', 'VALUE11', 'MFLAG11', 'QFLAG11', 'SFLAG11', 'VALUE12', 'MFLAG12', 'QFLAG12', 'SFLAG12', 'VALUE13', 'MFLAG13', 'QFLAG13', 'SFLAG13', 'VALUE14', 'MFLAG14', 'QFLAG14', 'SFLAG14', 'VALUE15', 'MFLAG15', 'QFLAG15', 'SFLAG15', 'VALUE16', 'MFLAG16', 'QFLAG16', 'SFLAG16', 'VALUE17', 'MFLAG17', 'QFLAG17', 'SFLAG17', 'VALUE18', 'MFLAG18', 'QFLAG18', 'SFLAG18', 'VALUE19', 'MFLAG19', 'QFLAG19', 'SFLAG19', 'VALUE20', 'MFLAG20', 'QFLAG20', 'SFLAG20', 'VALUE21', 'MFLAG21', 'QFLAG21', 'SFLAG21', 'VALUE22', 'MFLAG22', 'QFLAG22', 'SFLAG22', 'VALUE23', 'MFLAG23', 'QFLAG23', 'SFLAG23', 'VALUE24', 'MFLAG24', 'QFLAG24', 'SFLAG24', 'VALUE25', 'MFLAG25', 'QFLAG25', 'SFLAG25', 'VALUE26', 'MFLAG26', 'QFLAG26', 'SFLAG26', 'VALUE27', 'MFLAG27', 'QFLAG27', 'SFLAG27', 'VALUE28', 'MFLAG28', 'QFLAG28', 'SFLAG28', 'VALUE29', 'MFLAG29', 'QFLAG29', 'SFLAG29', 'VALUE30', 'MFLAG30', 'QFLAG30', 'SFLAG30', 'VALUE31', 'MFLAG31', 'QFLAG31', 'SFLAG31']

Now, the issue I have is that when reading in the data, there seem to be a lot of inf values, and those shouldn't be in the source data (the nearest thing in the data are -9999 values, which represent invalid data).

Normally, if I were using lists or the like, I would print out the whole thing to find alignment errors, and work out which rows are affected, then look at the source file to see what's happening. I'd like to know how to do the equivalent in pandas so I can figure out where these inf values are coming from.

Here's the code which shows me infs:

>>> tf[tf['ELEMENT']=='TMIN'].min()
COOP       300023
YEAR         1876
MONTH           1
ELEMENT      TMIN
VALUE1        -38
MFLAG1        inf
QFLAG1        inf
SFLAG1        inf
VALUE2        -34
MFLAG2        inf
QFLAG2        inf
SFLAG2        inf
VALUE3        -38
MFLAG3        inf
QFLAG3        inf
...
MFLAG28    inf
QFLAG28    inf
SFLAG28    inf
VALUE29    -46
MFLAG29    inf
QFLAG29    inf
SFLAG29    inf
VALUE30    -57
MFLAG30    inf
QFLAG30    inf
SFLAG30    inf
VALUE31    -40
MFLAG31    inf
QFLAG31    inf
SFLAG31    inf
Length: 128, dtype: object

Edit: Corrected column widths. Problem still remains.

share|improve this question
    
Did you check your widths? I think the fifth column (VALUE1) may be width 5. – SeanTater Jan 5 '14 at 15:27
    
@SeanTater You're quite right - thank you. Making that change sum(widths) adds up to the right number of columns. However, the problem still persists even with that change. – Marcin Jan 5 '14 at 15:52

First, let's mock up some data:

import numpy as np
import pandas

df = pandas.DataFrame(
    np.random.normal(size=(5,5)), 
    index='rA,rB,rC,rD,rE'.split(','),
    columns='cA,cB,cC,cD,cE'.split(',')
)
df[df > 1] = np.inf
df

That, for examples, should give something like this:

          cA        cB        cC        cD        cE
rA -1.202383 -0.625521       inf -0.888086 -0.215671
rB  0.537521 -1.149731  0.841687  0.190505       inf
rC -1.447124 -0.607486 -1.268923       inf  0.438190
rD -0.275085  0.793483  0.276376 -0.095727 -0.050957
rE -0.095414  0.048926  0.591899  0.298865 -0.308620

So now I can use fancy indexing to isolate all the infs.

print(df[np.isinf(df)].to_string())

    cA  cB   cC   cD   cE
rA NaN NaN  inf  NaN  NaN
rB NaN NaN  NaN  NaN  inf
rC NaN NaN  NaN  inf  NaN
rD NaN NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN
rE NaN NaN  NaN  NaN  NaN

But that's not really useful. So on top of finding the infs, we should stack the column index into the rows (unpivot, if you will) then drop all the NaN values. This will give us a nice summary of the rows/columns with infs.

df[np.isinf(df)].stack().dropna()

rA  cC    inf
rB  cE    inf
rC  cD    inf
dtype: float64
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for both of your answers. I'm going to work through them later. – Marcin Jan 5 '14 at 18:30

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