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I've made a generic function filter(arr, func) which filters an array using a given function as a parameter. Only those elements for which func(elem) return true should compose a new array.

The problem is that the low function returns true if the array item is less than 10 and the bool function returns true if the array item is a boolean. As booleans return either 1 or 0 in javascript this clashes with my low function.

Is their way I can stop the boolean value returning a number? or somehow keep the boolean results out of the low function

var array = [4, 8, 'bob', true, 'stink', 55, false, 'pepo', 11];
function low(val) {
return val < 10;
}

function word(str) {
 if(typeof str == 'string')
    return true; 
}

function bool(b) {
 if (typeof b == 'boolean')
    return true;
}

function filter(arr, func) {

   var newArr = [];

   for(var i = arr.length; i >= 0; i--) {
      var result = func(arr[i]);
      if(result == true) {
        newArr.push(arr[i]);    
    }
}
return newArr;
}

alert(filter(array, low));
share|improve this question
    
you should use three === when comparing with typeof... i.e. if (typeof myVar === "undefined") { ... } – Mauno Vähä Jan 5 '14 at 15:24
    
val < 10 will always true or false, not 1 or 0. – p.s.w.g Jan 5 '14 at 15:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is one way to do it:

var array = [4, 8, 'bob', true, 'stink', 55, false, 'pepo', 11];
function low(val) {
    return bool(val) === false ? val < 10 : false;
}

function word(str) {
    return typeof str === 'string' ? true : false;
}

function bool(b) {
    return typeof b === 'boolean' ? true : false;
}

function filter(arr, func) {

   var newArr = [];

   for(var i = arr.length; i >= 0; i--) {
      var result = func(arr[i]);
      if(result === true) {
        newArr.push(arr[i]);    
    }
}
return newArr;
}


alert(filter(array, low));

Added code also to fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3AS4d/ and used "===" checks instead of "==" so values will be compared against actual types without conversions.

Note also that your function such as bool would return true on boolean but undefined on any other values:

function bool(b) {
    if (typeof b === 'boolean')
        return true;
}

bool(true); // true
bool("haa"); // undefined

This is why I recommend these methods to be written such as:

function bool(b) {
    if (typeof b === 'boolean')
        return true;
    return false; // important
}

or as I like to make these, with single line notation:

some condition ? true : false;

example here:

function bool(b) {
    return typeof b === 'boolean' ? true : false;
}

or as assigning to variable:

var myVar = 1000 > 0 ? 1 : 0; // will result myVar to be 1;
share|improve this answer

Is their way I can stop the boolean value returning a number? or somehow keep the boolean results out of the low function

Booleans evaluated in numeric context (e.g. true < 10) are implicitly coerced to a number, their numeric values being:

Number(true) === 1
Number(false) === 0

So true < 10 evaluates as 1 < 10 which is true.

You can check whether the passed argument is a number before doing the comparison:

function low(val) {
    return typeof val == 'number' && val < 10;
}

I'll also note that ES5 has a built-in Array#filter method which may make your life easier:

var filteredArray = array.filter(low).reverse();
//reverse() because of the inverse iteration in your original filter function
share|improve this answer

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