Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm an experienced developer, but not in Perl. I usually learn Perl to hack a script, then I forget it again until the next time. Hence I'm looking for advice from the pros.

This time around I'm building a series of data analysis scripts. Grossly simplified, the program structure is like this:

01 my $config_var = 999;

03 my $result_var = 0;

05 foreach my $file (@files) {
06   open(my $fh, $file);
07   while (<$fh>) {
08     &analyzeLine($_);
09   }
10 }

12 print "$result_var\n";

14 sub analyzeLine ($) {
15   my $line = shift(@_);
16   $result_var = $result_var + calculatedStuff;
17 }

In real life, there are up to about half a dozen different config_vars and result_vars.

These scripts differ mostly in the values assigned to the config_vars. The main loop will be the same in every case, and analyzeLine() will be mostly the same but could have some small variations.

I can accomplish my purpose by making N copies of this code, with small changes here and there; but that grossly violates all kinds of rules of good design. Ideally, I would like to write a series of scripts containing only a set of config var initializations, followed by

do theCommonStuff;

Note that config_var (and its siblings) must be available to the common code, as must result_var and its lookalikes, upon which analyzeLine() does some calculations.

Should I pack my "common" code into a module? Create a class? Use global variables?

While not exactly code golf, I'm looking for a simple, compact solution that will allow me to DRY and write code only for the differences. I think I would rather not drive the code off a huge table containing all the configs, and certainly not adapt it to use a database.

Looking forward to your suggestions, and thanks!


Update

Since people asked, here's the real analyzeLine:

# Update stats with time and call data in one line.
sub processLine ($) {
  my $line = shift(@_);
  return unless $line =~ m/$log_match/;
  # print "$1 $2\n";
  my ($minute, $function) = ($1, $2);
  $startMinute = $minute if not $startMinute;
  $endMinute = $minute;
  if ($minute eq $currentMinute) {
    $minuteCount = $minuteCount + 1;
  } else {
    if ($minuteCount > $topMinuteCount) {
      $topMinute = $currentMinute;
      $topMinuteCount = $minuteCount;
      printf ("%40s %s : %d\n", '', $topMinute, $topMinuteCount);
    }
    $totalMinutes = $totalMinutes + 1;
    $totalCount = $totalCount + $minuteCount;
    $currentMinute = $minute;
    $minuteCount = 1;
  }
}

Since these variables are largely interdependent, I think a functional solution with separate calculations won't be practical. I apologize for misleading people.

share|improve this question
    
Can you give us a practical example of what you want to accomplish with this? This looks like a good opportunity to use functional programming. –  Leonardo Herrera Jan 19 '10 at 13:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Go ahead and create a class hierarchy. Your task is an ideal playground for OOP style of programming. Here's an example:

package Common;
sub new{
  my $class=shift;
  my $this=bless{},$class;
  $this->init();
  return $this;
}
sub init{}
sub theCommonStuff(){ 
  my $this=shift;
  for(1..10){ $this->analyzeLine($_); }
}
sub analyzeLine(){
  my($this,$line)=@_;
  $this->{'result'}.=$line;
}

package Special1;
our @ISA=qw/Common/;
sub init{
  my $this=shift;
  $this->{'sep'}=',';   # special param: separator
}
sub analyzeLine(){      # modified logic
  my($this,$line)=@_;
  $this->{'result'}.=$line.$this->{'sep'};
}

package main;
my $c = new Common;
my $s = new Special1;
$c->theCommonStuff;
$s->theCommonStuff;
print $c->{'result'}."\n";
print $s->{'result'}."\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Sounds and looks good, thank you! I can put these packages in separate files, each named like the package, right? –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 13:23
6  
Please do not use and do not recommend indirect object syntax, however superficially appealing it is to be able to write new Common rather than Common->new. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 19 '10 at 13:57
1  
@Carl Smotricz: You asked the question, so don't feel bad about choosing one answer over the other. Just note that @catwalk accesses the internals of the object (violates encapsulation) instead of using getters and setters and the only reason I used Class::Accessor::Faster was to avoid having to write accessors ;-) –  Sinan Ünür Jan 19 '10 at 16:11
1  
Oh, of course, allowing the user of the module to specify a sub to do the actual "analysis" per line gives you flexibility and separation between scaffolding and actual work. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 19 '10 at 16:14
3  
For excellent OOP goodness with less boilerplate, check out Moose. moose.perl.org –  daotoad Jan 19 '10 at 16:55

Two comments: First, don't post line numbers as they make it more difficult than necessary to copy, paste and edit. Second, don't use &func() to invoke a sub. See perldoc perlsub:

A subroutine may be called using an explicit & prefix. The & is optional in modern Perl, ... Not only does the & form make the argument list optional, it also disables any prototype checking on arguments you do provide.

In short, using & can be surprising unless you know what you are doing and why you are doing it.

Also, don't use prototypes in Perl. They are not the same as prototypes in other languages and, again, can have very surprising effects unless you know what you are doing.

Do not forget to check the return value of system calls such as open. Use autodie with modern perls.

For your specific problem, collect all configuration variables in a hash. Pass that hash to analyzeLine.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings; use strict;
use autodie;

my %config = (
    frobnicate => 'yes',
    machinate  => 'no',
);

my $result;
$result += analyze_file(\%config, $_) for @ARGV;

print "Result = $result\n";

sub analyze_file {
    my ($config, $file) = @_;

    my $result;

    open my $fh, '<', $file;
    while ( my $line = <$fh> ) {
        $result += analyze_line($config, $line);
    }

    close $fh;

    return $result;
}

sub analyze_line {
    my ($line) = @_;
    return length $line;
}

Of course, you will note that $config is being passed all over the place, which means you might want to turn this in to a OO solution:

#!/usr/bin/perl

package My::Analyzer;

use strict; use warnings;

use base 'Class::Accessor::Faster';

__PACKAGE__->follow_best_practice;
__PACKAGE__->mk_accessors( qw( analyzer frobnicate machinate ) );

sub analyze_file {
    my $self = shift;
    my ($file) = @_;

    my $result;

    open my $fh, '<', $file;
    while ( my $line = <$fh> ) {
        $result += $self->analyze_line($line);
    }

    close $fh;

    return $result;
}

sub analyze_line {
    my $self = shift;
    my ($line) = @_;
    return $self->get_analyzer->($line);
}

package main;

use warnings; use strict;
use autodie;

my $x = My::Analyzer->new;

$x->set_analyzer(sub {
        my $length; $length += length $_ for @_; return $length;
});
$x->set_frobnicate('yes');
$x->set_machinate('no');


my $result;
$result += $x->analyze_file($_) for @ARGV;

print "Result = $result\n";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the many thoughtful comments! I'd included line numbers to make it easier to talk about the code, as I had expected a more abstract discussion. –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 14:56
    
I had thought prototypes were a good idea to allow parameter checking; also, I use & to make it clear I'm calling self-defined functions. But I can certainly do without both. –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 14:57
    
I am indeed using or die on my open, also on opendir, thanks. Again, sorry about oversimplifying my example. Nix on the autodie, my perl environments range from 5.005 to 5.10. –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 15:00
    
Your OO solution looks pretty advanced, and may be using features not found in my old Perl; also, I can't readily install new CPAN packages. I'll probably end up bastardizing the suggestions I've gotten here. –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 15:05
    
Thanks also for your prototype link. Most enlightening, as I had been dying to ask "why?" Now the following quote: My first thought any time I see code with prototypes is that the person who wrote it doesn't know Perl very well. provides a perfectly good reason to use prototypes: I really don't know Perl very well, and I intend to advertise the fact! :) –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 15:19

If all the common code is in one function, a function taking your config variables as parameters, and returning the result variables (either as return values, or as in/out parameters), will do. Otherwise, making a class ("package") is a good idea, too.

sub common_func {
    my ($config, $result) = @_;
    # ...
    $result->{foo} += do_stuff($config->{bar});
    # ...
}

Note in the above that both the config and result are hashes (actually, references thereto). You can use any other data structure that you feel will suit your goal.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the prototype? –  Sinan Ünür Jan 19 '10 at 13:58
    
I prototype out of habit, but yes, it's optional. –  Chris Jester-Young Jan 19 '10 at 14:08
3  
    
I don't know if the -1 is from you, and if it's over the prototype, but if so, a retraction of the downvote would be most appreciated. (If it's for something else, I'd love to hear about it.) :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Jan 19 '10 at 14:26
1  
@Chris Jester-Young: Nope, it was just the prototype issue. I was just away from SO for a while. –  Sinan Ünür Jan 19 '10 at 16:12

Some thoughts:

  • If there are several $result_vars, I would recommend creating a separate subroutine for calculating each one.
  • If a subroutine relies on information outside that function, it should be passed in as a parameter to that subroutine, rather than relying on global state.
  • Alternatively wrap the whole thing in a class, with $result_var as an attribute of the class.

Practically speaking, there are a couple ways you could implement this:

(1) Have your &analyzeLine function return calculatedStuff, and add it to &result_var in a loop outside the function:

  $result_var = 0;
  foreach my $file (@files) {
      open(my $fh, $file);
          while (<$fh>) {
              $result_var += analyzeLine($_);
          }
      }
  }

  sub analyzeLine ($) {
      my $line = shift(@_);
      return calculatedStuff;
  }

(2) Pass $result_var into analyzeLine explicitly, and return the changed $result_var.

  $result_var = 0;
  foreach my $file (@files) {
      open(my $fh, $file);
          while (<$fh>) {
              $result_var = addLineToResult($result_var, $_);
          }
      }
  }

  sub addLineToResult ($$) {
      my $running_total = shift(@_);
      my $line = shift(@_);
      return $running_total + calculatedStuff;
  }

The important part is that if you separate out functions for each of your several $result_vars, you'll be more readily able to write clean code. Don't worry about optimizing yet. That can come later, when your code has proven itself slow. The improved design will make optimization easier when the time comes.

share|improve this answer
    
Several separate subs for the results is not practical, sorry to have given insufficient info. I had considered passing everything via parameters but will probably end up with classes. Thanks for your input! –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 15:22
2  
There is no point in prototyping your sub if you're just going to bypass the prototype by using & later. –  Ether Jan 19 '10 at 17:42
    
@Carl--No worries. That's why there are multiple design patterns. Still might be useful for someone reading this later. @Ether--Thanks. I've fixed that now. I'm no Perl guru, just a fan of clean code. –  jcdyer Jan 19 '10 at 19:37

why not create a function and using $config_var and $result_var as parameters?

share|improve this answer
    
There are several of each, and I'd have to pass references to the result_vars. Also, if the function is in a separate file, how to I access it from the "main" script? –  Carl Smotricz Jan 19 '10 at 13:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.