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I'm trying to generate a collection of all 2^N - 1 possible combinations of a given List of length N. The collection will map the number of elements in a combination to an ordered list of combinations containing combinations of the specific length. For instance, for the List:

[A, B, C, D]

I want to generate the map:

{
    1 -> [{A}, {B}, {C}, {D}]
    2 -> [{A, B}, {A, C}, {A, D}, {B, C}, {B, D}, {C, D}]
    3 -> [{A, B, C}, {A, B, D}, {A, C, D}, {B, C, D}]
    4 -> [{A, B, C, D}]
}

The generated database should maintain the original order (where [] represents an ordered series (List), and {} represents an un-ordered group (Set)), and run as fast as possible.

I was struggling with some recursive code all day (I know the implementation should be recursive) but couldn't get to the bottom of it.

Is there a reference I can use / a ready implementation of such algorithm?

UPDATE:

Thanks to previous answers, I came up with the following implementation:

public class OrderedPowerSet<E> {
    private static final int ELEMENT_LIMIT = 12;
    private List<E> inputList;
    public int N;
    private Map<Integer, List<LinkedHashSet<E>>> map = 
            new HashMap<Integer, List<LinkedHashSet<E>>>();

    public OrderedPowerSet(List<E> list) {
        inputList = list;
        N = list.size();
        if (N > ELEMENT_LIMIT) {
            throw new RuntimeException(
                    "List with more then " + ELEMENT_LIMIT + " elements is too long...");
        }
    }

    public List<LinkedHashSet<E>> getPermutationsList(int elementCount) {
        if (elementCount < 1 || elementCount > N) {
            throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(
                    "Can only generate permutations for a count between 1 to " + N);
        }
        if (map.containsKey(elementCount)) {
            return map.get(elementCount);
        }

        ArrayList<LinkedHashSet<E>> list = new ArrayList<LinkedHashSet<E>>();

        if (elementCount == N) {
            list.add(new LinkedHashSet<E>(inputList));
        } else if (elementCount == 1) {
            for (int i = 0 ; i < N ; i++) {
                LinkedHashSet<E> set = new LinkedHashSet<E>();
                set.add(inputList.get(i));
                list.add(set);
            }
        } else {
            list = new ArrayList<LinkedHashSet<E>>();
            for (int i = 0 ; i <= N - elementCount ; i++) {
                @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
                ArrayList<E> subList = (ArrayList<E>)((ArrayList<E>)inputList).clone();
                for (int j = i ; j >= 0 ; j--) {
                    subList.remove(j);
                }
                OrderedPowerSet<E> subPowerSet = 
                        new OrderedPowerSet<E>(subList);

                List<LinkedHashSet<E>> pList = 
                        subPowerSet.getPermutationsList(elementCount-1);
                for (LinkedHashSet<E> s : pList) {
                    LinkedHashSet<E> set = new LinkedHashSet<E>();
                    set.add(inputList.get(i));
                    set.addAll(s);
                    list.add(set);
                }               
            }
        }

        map.put(elementCount, list);

        return map.get(elementCount);
    }
}

I would be happy to get some feedback for ways to improve this.

UPDATE 2:

I fixed a few issues in the code and tested it.

share|improve this question
    
I'm not sure recursion is particularly helpful for this problem. Try thinking about it iteratively instead for a bit. – Patricia Shanahan Jan 5 '14 at 15:30
2  
If you do it iteratively, note that you can generate the size i and size N-i lists simultaneously. Think in terms of partitioning the list into two subsets, and adding each subset to one of your result lists. – Patricia Shanahan Jan 5 '14 at 15:33
    
That's an interesting approach, I'll look into it. – Elist Jan 5 '14 at 15:34
up vote 13 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is essentially the power set (minus perhaps the empty set). Guava actually has a method for this: Sets.powerSet(). You can view the source of the Sets class to see how the method is implemented if you want to write it yourself; you might need to modify it to return a List instead of a Set since you want to preserve order, although this change should not be too drastic. Once you have the power set, it should be trivial to iterate over it and construct the map you want.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I would have to write it again, since I need to maintain original the order (you might call it the power list...). – Elist Jan 5 '14 at 15:40

What you're asking is generating all possible subsets of a set. You can think of it as iterating over all possible binary arrays of size N (the size of your list):

000000...000
000000...001
000000...010
000000...011
etc.

Why is that? The answer is simple: 1 indicates that an element exists in a subset, while 0 indicates that it is absent.

So, the basic algorithm is obvious:

s = [A, B, C, D]

for i=0 to 2^N-1:
   b = convert_number_to_bin_array(i)
   ss = calculate_subset_based_on_bin_array(s, b)
   print ss

Where calculate_subset_based_on_bin_array iterates on b and s and selects elements from s[current] where b[current] = 1.

The above will print out all existing subsets. You can adapt this algorithm in order to get the map that you've asked for in your question.

share|improve this answer
    
You're right, but I think your suggested implementation forces me to approximately O((N^2 - 1) * N * N), and I guess I can get a more efficient one. – Elist Jan 5 '14 at 15:49
    
What I'm saing is that if you know where to put 1 in the binary array - you can instead just add the corresponding element to the current list. – Elist Jan 5 '14 at 15:50
    
@Elist of course you can improve the algorithm I provided, that's why it's called basic :-) – spektom Jan 5 '14 at 15:52
    
Sure, and thanks anyway :) – Elist Jan 5 '14 at 15:56

Here is a code I have tested to generate all possible combinations out of given array:

enter code here
import java.util.Arrays;

public class PasswordGen {
static String[] options = { "a", "b", "c", "d" };
static String[] places = new String[options.length];
static int count;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Starting with initial position of a i.e. 0
    sequence(0, places.clone());
}

private static void sequence(int level, String[] holder) {
    if (level >= options.length) {
        // combination complete
        System.out.println("" + (++count) + " Combination "
                + Arrays.toString(holder));
        return;
    }

    String val = options[level];
    String[] inrHolder = null;
    for (int c = 0; c < holder.length; c++) {
        inrHolder = holder.clone();
        if (inrHolder[c] == null) {
            inrHolder[c] = val;
            sequence(level + 1, inrHolder.clone());
        }
    }
    return;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for all possible SETS of combinations of a list, which means, for instance, that [a, b] and [b, a] will not both appear in the output (becouse a is before b in the input, and [b, a] doesn't maintain the original order). – Elist Aug 10 '14 at 9:06
    
You're right - this code generates all the combinations - but the OP wants to generate the powerset of an array/list and insert it into a Map that will be sorted by the size of each subset. The OP misused the term "combination" - I fixed the title of the question to point out that what we're looking for is the power set. +1 for a nice implementation of combinations though :) – alfasin Apr 15 '15 at 21:34
static Map<Integer, List<LinkedList<Integer>>> powerset = new HashMap<>();

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    powerset(Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3));
    for (Integer key : powerset.keySet()) {
        System.out.print(key + " -> ");
        System.out.println(Arrays.toString(powerset.get(key).toArray()));
    }
}

static void powerset(List<Integer> src) {
    powerset(new LinkedList<>(), src);
}

private static void powerset(LinkedList<Integer> prefix, List<Integer> src) {
    if (src.size() > 0) {
        prefix = new LinkedList<>(prefix); //create a copy to not modify the orig
        src = new LinkedList<>(src); //copy
        Integer curr = src.remove(0);
        collectResult(prefix, curr);
        powerset(prefix, src);
        prefix.add(curr);
        powerset(prefix, src);
    }
}

private static void collectResult(LinkedList<Integer> prefix, Integer curr) {
    prefix = new LinkedList<>(prefix); //copy
    prefix.add(curr);
    List<LinkedList<Integer>> addTo;
    if (powerset.get(prefix.size()) == null) {
        List<LinkedList<Integer>> newList = new LinkedList<>();
        addTo = newList;
    } else {
        addTo = powerset.get(prefix.size());
    }
    addTo.add(prefix);
    powerset.put(prefix.size(), addTo);
}

OUTPUT

1 -> [[1], [2], [3]]
2 -> [[2, 3], [1, 2], [1, 3]]
3 -> [[1, 2, 3]]
share|improve this answer

I test the code proposed by Elist and I found errors.

Here is a proposed correction : (in the last else of the function getPermutation(), I made two changes)

public class OrderedPowerSet<E> {
private ArrayList<E> inputList;
public int N;
private Map<Integer, List<Set<E>>> map = 
        new HashMap<Integer, List<Set<E>>>();

public OrderedPowerSet(ArrayList<E> list) {
    inputList = list;
    N = list.size();
}

public List<Set<E>> getPermutationsList(int elementCount) {
    if (elementCount < 1 || elementCount > N) {
        throw new IndexOutOfBoundsException(
                "Can only generate permutations for a count between 1 to " + N);
    }
    if (map.containsKey(elementCount)) {
        return map.get(elementCount);
    }

    ArrayList<Set<E>> list = new ArrayList<Set<E>>();

    if (elementCount == N) {
        list.add(new HashSet<E>(inputList));
    } else if (elementCount == 1) {
        for (int i = 0 ; i < N ; i++) {
            Set<E> set = new HashSet<E>();
            set.add(inputList.get(i));
            list.add(set);
        }
    } else {
        for (int i = 0 ; i < N-elementCount ; i++) {
            @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
            ArrayList<E> subList = (ArrayList<E>)inputList.clone(); // one change
            subList.remove(0);
            OrderedPowerSet<E> subPowerSet = 
                    new OrderedPowerSet<E>(subList);
            for (Set<E> s : subPowerSet.getPermutationsList(elementCount-1)) {
                Set<E> set = new HashSet<E>();
                set.add(inputList.get(i));
                set.addAll(s);
                list.add(set); // second change
            }

        }
    }

    map.put(elementCount, list);

    return map.get(elementCount);
}

}

share|improve this answer
public static List<String> getCombinationsLists(List<String> elements)
{

    //return list with empty String
    if(elements.size() == 0){
        List<String> allLists = new ArrayList<String>();
        allLists.add("");
        return allLists ;
    }

    String first_ele = elements.remove(0);
    List<String> rest = getCobminationLists(elements);
    int restsize = rest.size();
    //Mapping the first_ele with each of the rest of the elements.
    for (int i = 0; i < restsize; i++) {
        String ele = first_ele + rest.get(i);
        rest.add(ele);
    }

    return   rest;
}

This Power set is one of the exercise in the book SICP "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programming".Every Programmer should read it.

share|improve this answer

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