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Is it possible to improve the efficiency of those linq requests? I use two different loops... Can you help me to optimize this code?

        double[] x = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };
        double[] y = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };            
        IEnumerable<int> range = Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length);
        double[] y_sorted = (from n in range orderby x[n] select y[n]).ToArray();
        double[] x_sorted = (from n in range orderby x[n] select x[n]).ToArray();

This code in python is like that if you prefer:

        x_index = argsort(x)
        x_sorted = [x[i] for i in x_index]
        y_sorted = [y[i] for i in x_index]

you will notice that, in this python code, i use only one sort. that's not the case of this c# code.

we should get at the end:

        x_sorted = { 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 5, 7 }
        y_sorted = { 3, 1, 6, 2, 7, 4, 5 }

Fred

Edit: I use the program of Diadistis (after a small correction)

So here we go: Array.Sort(x, y) (0.05) is the fastest way following (0.18) by

        int[] x_index = Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length).OrderBy(i => x[i]).ToArray();
        double[] x_sorted = x_index.Select(i => x[i]).ToArray();
        double[] y_sorted = x_index.Select(i => y[i]).ToArray();

The other solutions are quite equivalent (~0.35) in time consumption on my pc.

If someone have an interesting idea, I will profile it and update this post.

share|improve this question
    
Nope, that looks ok to me. Did you perhaps mean orderby y[n] in the first statement? –  leppie Jan 19 '10 at 12:58
1  
no, that was intentional. –  Frederic Jan 19 '10 at 13:02
    
What does your code do? –  dtb Jan 19 '10 at 13:05
    
@dtb and @Christian : I added more informations to my question. Thanks for your comments. –  Frederic Jan 19 '10 at 13:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's ok but I'd prefer a simpler syntax :

double[] x = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };
double[] y = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };

double[] x_sorted = x.OrderBy(d => d).ToArray();
double[] y_sorted = y.OrderBy(d => d).ToArray();

Edit:

Argh... I failed to spot that this was an associative array sort.

double[] x = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };
double[] y = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };  

double[] y_sorted = y.Clone() as double[];
double[] x_sorted = x.Clone() as double[];

Array.Sort(x_sorted, y_sorted);

Edit 2 1/2

And some performance tests :

public class Program
{
    delegate void SortMethod(double[] x, double[] y);

    private const int ARRAY_SIZE = 3000000;

    private static Random RandomNumberGenerator = new Random();

    private static double[] x = GenerateTestData(ARRAY_SIZE);
    private static double[] y = GenerateTestData(ARRAY_SIZE);

    private static double[] GenerateTestData(int count)
    {
        var data = new double[count];

        for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            data[i] = RandomNumberGenerator.NextDouble();
        }

        return data;
    }

    private static void SortMethod1(double[] x, double[] y)
    {
        Array.Sort(x, y);
    }

    private static void SortMethod2(double[] x, double[] y)
    {
        IEnumerable<int> range = Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length);
        x = (from n in range orderby x[n] select y[n]).ToArray();
        y = (from n in range orderby x[n] select x[n]).ToArray();
    }

    private static void SortMethod3(double[] x, double[] y)
    {
        int[] x_index = 
            Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length).OrderBy(i => x[i]).ToArray();

        x = x_index.Select(i => x[i]).ToArray();
        y = x_index.Select(i => y[i]).ToArray();
    }

    private static void SortMethod4(double[] x, double[] y)
    {
        int[] range =
            Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length).OrderBy(i => x[i]).ToArray();

        var q = (
            from n in range
            orderby x[n]
            select new { First = x[n], Second = y[n] }).ToArray();

        x = q.Select(t => t.First).ToArray();
        y = q.Select(t => t.Second).ToArray();
    }

    private static void SortMethodPerformanceTest(SortMethod sortMethod)
    {
        double[] y_sorted = y.Clone() as double[];
        double[] x_sorted = x.Clone() as double[];

        var sw = new Stopwatch();

        sw.Start();
        sortMethod.Invoke(x_sorted, y_sorted);
        sw.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine(
            string.Format(
                "{0} : {1}",
                sortMethod.Method.Name,
                sw.Elapsed));
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("For array length : " + ARRAY_SIZE);
        Console.WriteLine("------------------------------");

        SortMethodPerformanceTest(SortMethod1);
        SortMethodPerformanceTest(SortMethod2);
        SortMethodPerformanceTest(SortMethod3);
        SortMethodPerformanceTest(SortMethod4);

        Console.WriteLine("Press any key to continue...");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

And the results :

For array length : 3000000
------------------------------
SortMethod1 : 00:00:00.6088503 // Array.Sort(Array, Array)
SortMethod2 : 00:00:07.9583779 // Original
SortMethod3 : 00:00:04.5023336 // dtb's Linq Alternative
SortMethod4 : 00:00:06.6115911 // Christian's Linq Alternative
share|improve this answer
    
Also avoid calling ToArray() unless really required - you get an IEnumerable<double> which defers execution until necessary. –  GraemeF Jan 19 '10 at 13:05
3  
+1 for Array.Sort(Array,Array) –  dtb Jan 19 '10 at 13:38
    
there is a mistake in your program. you always call SortMethod1... –  Frederic Jan 19 '10 at 14:49
    
o_O indeed, not my day.... –  Diadistis Jan 19 '10 at 14:57
    
After fixing this the results now make sense –  Diadistis Jan 19 '10 at 15:03

If I read your code correctly, you're trying to sort two arrays by the elements of the first array.

The literal translation of your Python code to C# would be something like this:

int[] x_index = Enumerable.Range(0, x.Length).OrderBy(i => x[i]).ToArray();
double[] x_sorted = x_index.Select(i => x[i]).ToArray();
double[] y_sorted = x_index.Select(i => y[i]).ToArray();

Alternatively, you could zip the two arrays to an enumerable of tuples and then sort this by the first item:

var sorted = Enumerable.Zip(x, y, Tuple.Create<double, double>)
                       .OrderBy(t => t.Item1)
                       .ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
aie. I forgot one constraint... I use .net3.5 (but I really would prefer to use .net4!!) –  Frederic Jan 19 '10 at 13:28
    
You can easily define a Zip method and Tuples in .NET3.5 yourself. –  dtb Jan 19 '10 at 13:30
    
ok let's say functions from .net 4 are admitted :) –  Frederic Jan 19 '10 at 14:00

This could be faster as you only sort once:

var q =
    (from n in range
    orderby x[n]
    select new { First = x[n], Second = y[n] }).ToArray();
double[] x_sorted = q.Select(t => t.First).ToArray();
double[] y_sorted = q.Select(t => t.Second).ToArray();
share|improve this answer
2  
Nice; similar to my Tuple answer. You need to add a ToArray to prevent q from being executed twice. –  dtb Jan 19 '10 at 13:24
    
@dtb: Thanks, incorporated your improvement. –  Christian Jan 19 '10 at 13:30
    
No idea if this is an improvement in terms of speed. I just pointed out that q was executed twice which I thought may not be what you intended. –  dtb Jan 19 '10 at 13:32

You can also do following. Keeping in view that if you meant y[n] as in leppie comment

double[] x = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };        
double[] y = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };  

Array.Sort<double>(x);
Array.Sort<double>(y);

Update

Should be as following to get correct result.

    double[] x = { 2, 3, 1, 5, 7, 2, 3 };
    double[] y = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 }; 
    Array.Sort<double, double>(x, y);
share|improve this answer
    
This code does not create new arrays. It sort in place. –  affan Jan 19 '10 at 13:11
    
+1; clone the array if the original should be kept intact. –  Anton Tykhyy Jan 19 '10 at 13:12

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