Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run my code, node.js throw "RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded" exception caused by too much recursion calls. I tried to increase node.js stack-size by sudo node --stack-size=16000 app, but node.js crash without any error message. When I run this again without sudo, then node.js print 'Segmentation fault: 11'. Is there a possibility to solve this without removing recursion call? Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you need such deep recursion in the first place? –  Dan Abramov Jan 5 '14 at 22:36
    
Please, can you post some code? Segmentation fault: 11 usually means a bug in node. –  vkurchatkin Jan 6 '14 at 6:33
1  
@Dan Abramov: Why deep recursion? This can be a problem if you wish to iterate over an array or list and perform an async operation on each (e.g. some database operation). If you use the callback from the async operation to move on to the next item, then there will be at least one extra level of recursion for each item in the list. The anti-pattern provided by heinob below stops the stack from blowing out. –  Philip Callender Dec 11 '14 at 15:58
    
@PhilipCallender I didn't realize you were doing async stuff, thanks for clarification! –  Dan Abramov Dec 11 '14 at 20:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You should wrap your recursive function call into a

  • setTimeout,
  • setImmediate or
  • process.nextTick

function to give node.js the chance to clear the stack. If you don't and there are many loops without any real async function call or you do not wait on the callback, then your RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded will be inevitable.

There are many articles concerning "Potential Async Loop". Here is one.

Now some more example code:

// ANTI-PATTERN
// THIS WILL CRASH

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            // this will crash after some rounds with
            // "stack exceed", because control is never given back
            // to the browser 
            // -> no GC and browser "dead" ... "VERY BAD"
            potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});

This is right:

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            // Now the browser gets the chance to clear the stack
            // after every round by getting the control back.
            // Afterwards the loop continues
            setTimeout( function() {
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
            }, 0 );
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});

Now your loop may become too slow, because we loose a little time (one browser roundtrip) per round. But you do not have to call setTimeout in every round. Normally it is o.k. to do it every 1000th time. But this may differ depending on your stack size:

var condition = false, // potential means "maybe never"
    max = 1000000;

function potAsyncLoop( i, resume ) {
    if( i < max ) {
        if( condition ) { 
            someAsyncFunc( function( err, result ) { 
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, callback );
            });
        } else {
            if( i % 1000 === 0 ) {
                setTimeout( function() {
                    potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
                }, 0 );
            } else {
                potAsyncLoop( i+1, resume ); 
            }
        }
    } else {
        resume();
    }
}
potAsyncLoop( 0, function() {
    // code after the loop
    ...
});
share|improve this answer
1  
There were some good and bad points in your answer. I really liked that you mentioned setTimeout() et al. But there is no need to use setTimeout(fn, 1), since setTimeout(fn, 0) is perfectly fine (so we don't need the setTimeout(fn, 1) every % 1000 hack). It allows the JavaScript VM to clear the stack, and immediately resume execution. In node.js the process.nextTick() is slightly better because it allows node.js to do some other stuff (I/O IIRC) also before letting your callback resume. –  joonas.fi Mar 1 '14 at 10:44
    
you are right. 0 is better. fixed it. –  heinob Mar 1 '14 at 11:17
1  
I would say it's better to use setImmediate instead of setTimeout in these cases. –  BaNz Mar 7 '14 at 11:19
2  
@joonas.fi: My "hack" with %1000 is necessary. Doing a setImmediate/setTimeout (even with 0) on every loop is dramatically slower. –  heinob Mar 26 '14 at 6:14
1  
Care to update your in-code German comments with English translation...?:) I do understand but others might not be so lucky. –  Robert Rossmann Jan 21 at 10:35

If you don't want to implement your own wrapper, you can use a queue system, e.g. async.queue, queue.

share|improve this answer

I found a dirty solution:

/bin/bash -c "ulimit -s 65500; exec /usr/local/bin/node --stack-size=65500 /path/to/app.js"

It just increase call stack limit. I think that this is not suitable for production code, but I needed it for script that run only once.

share|improve this answer
3  
I wish you good luck! –  heinob Mar 1 '14 at 11:18

In some languages this can be solved with tail call optimization, where the recursion call is transformed under the hood into a loop so no maximum stack size reached error exists.

But in javascript the current engines don't support this, it's foreseen for new version of the language Ecmascript 6.

Node.js has some flags to enable ES6 features but tail call is not yet available.

So you can refactor your code to implement a technique called trampolining, or refactor in order to transform recursion into a loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. My recursion call does not return value, so is there any way to call function and not wait for the result? –  user2078693 Jan 5 '14 at 19:17
    
And does the function it alter some data, like an array, what does it do the function, what are the inputs/outputs? –  jhadesdev Jan 5 '14 at 19:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.